Campus & Community

Dr. Paul Grogan Awarded CAREER Grant from National Science Foundation (NSF)

SSE Assistant Professor Grogan Will Launch Research on “Understanding Strategic Dynamics in the Engineering of Decentralized Systems” in Fall 2020.

Dr. Paul Grogan, NSF CAREER award recipient.

Dr. Paul Grogan has been awarded the Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant of $500,000 for a project on Understanding Strategic Dynamics in the Engineering of Decentralized Systems, which builds on a line of economic methods applied to engineering design including utility theory, decision theory, social choice and game theory.

“On behalf of the School of Systems and Enterprises, I’d like to congratulate Dr. Grogan on receiving this prestigious NSF CAREER award for his excellent work on strategic dynamics using game theory,” said Dean Yehia Massoud. He added, “I believe that the grant will enable him to conduct very impactful research in the field that will have a wide array of applications on society.”

“The research has immediate applications within the infrastructures of power, transportation, satellite and communications systems," said Dr. Grogan, whose research has focused largely on satellite systems that collect imagery on Earth to help detect floods and fires and forecast weather conditions. “Putting satellites into space can help change the way that government agencies think about spaces missions and the possibilities of working with other commercial partners.” 

Dr. Grogan anticipates that his work can be used by specific domains, such as government agencies like NASA or commercial space firms, offering analysis and insights to support concrete recommendations for specific design problems. Down the road, Dr. Grogan envisions using strategic dynamics in game-based learning platforms to motivate and inspire younger generations to pursue careers in engineering. He also sees the opportunity for strategic dynamics to become part of the undergraduate curriculum, which would expose students to a broader set of possibilities for exploring how systems interact.