CSW Event: Maria Konnikova, "How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes"

Wednesday, March 5, 2014 ( 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm )

Location: Babbio 122

Contact: 
jhorgan@stevens.edu

Wednesday, March 5, 3-4:30 p.m., Babbio Auditorium
"How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes"
A Talk by Psychologist and New Yorker Blogger Maria Konnikova.
Live stream here.

Abstract:
No fictional character is more renowned for his powers of thought and observation than Sherlock Holmes. But is his extraordinary intellect merely a gift of fiction, or can we learn to cultivate these abilities ourselves, to improve our lives at work and at home? We can, says psychologist and journalist Maria Konnikova, and in this talk, she shows us how. Beginning with the “brain attic”—Holmes’s metaphor for how we store information and organize knowledge—Konnikova unpacks the mental strategies that lead to clearer thinking and deeper insights. Drawing on neuroscience and psychology, she explores Holmes’s unique methods of ever-present mindfulness, astute observation, and logical deduction. In doing so, she teaches how anyone, with some self-awareness and a little practice, can employ these same methods to sharpen their perceptions, solve difficult problems, and enhance their creative powers. 

Biography:
Maria Konnikova was born in Moscow, Russia and came to the United States when she was four years old. Her first book, Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes (Viking/Penguin, 2013), was a New York Times bestseller and has been translated into 16 languages. Her second book, on the psychology of the con, is scheduled for publication by Viking/Penguin in 2014. Her writing has appeared online and in print in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times, Slate, The New Republic, The Paris Review, The Wall Street Journal, Salon, The Boston Globe, The Observer, Scientific American MIND, WIRED, and Scientific American, among numerous other publications. Maria blogs regularly for The New Yorker and formerly wrote the “Literally Psyched” column for Scientific American and the popular psychology blog “Artful Choice” for Big Think. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University, where she studied psychology, creative writing, and government, and received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Columbia University.