Maritime Systems

Type: 
Program
ID: 
19
Parent Unit Type: 
Department
Parent Unit ID: 
5

Maritime Systems Doctoral Fellowship

The Maritime Security Doctoral Fellowship is a three-year fellowship for high-potential, academically talented students interested in conducting cutting edge research and advanced academic study in the fields of Maritime and Homeland Security. The research-oriented fellowship program provides full tuition support, a monthly stipend and other paid fees for individuals of superior caliber who will make original contributions to the theory and practice in the field of Maritime Security.  The three-year accelerated Doctoral Fellowship is supported through funding by a Department of Homeland Security Career Development Grant (CDG).

The mission of the Fellowship program is to provide a strong foundation for solving critical national and global challenges in the maritime domain and Marine Transportation System (MTS) through the use of state-of-the-art technologies and scientific approaches.  

The recipient of the Fellowship award, will receive a PhD in Ocean Engineering.   To learn more about Stevens Ocean Engineering degree requirements, please visit the following weblink: http://www.stevens.edu/sit/graduate/academic_programs/oe.cfm

Program Objectives: It is the objective of Stevens Charles V. Schaefer Jr. School of Engineering and Science (SES), in which the fellowship will be hosted to educate the next generation of technology leaders who will have positive impact on U.S. and global Maritime and Homeland Security challenges through research and development of new maritime security technology applications, strategies for maritime resilience, and improved methods for emergency planning, preparedness, and response.  
Doctoral Study and Areas for Research

The candidate awarded the Maritime Security Doctoral Fellowship may pursue doctoral research from a wide range of areas related to homeland security.  Some of these include, but are not limited to:

  • Advancing technologies for the detection and mitigation of maritime threats, including active and passive acoustics, electro-optics, including infrared and visible light sensing, marine and HF radar, etc.
  • Techniques for exploring synergies among sensing technologies to improve detection, minimize false alarms, and improve resource efficiency
  • Mathematical techniques for categorizing threat types by analyzing their signatures, e.g. determining water-borne vessel classes from acoustic signatures
  • Methodologies for recovery from supply chain disruptions due to natural and man-made causes
  • Oceanographic and meteorological modeling to mitigate effects of airborne and waterborne dispersions due to disasters

Admission Criteria: Students applying for the Maritime Security Doctoral Fellowship must be U.S. Citizens. The Fellowship admission review process will be based on a committee review and assessment of the candidate?s scholastic record, Master?s thesis (if available), professional accomplishments and fit between his/her research objectives and those of Stevens Maritime Systems faculty.  The recipient of the Doctoral Fellowship award must be recognized to have the potential to advance the state of knowledge in the field of Maritime and Homeland Security.  
Admission into the Doctoral Fellowship program requires that the candidate meet the following criteria:

  • Be a U.S. Citizen
  • Have completed an undergraduate and Master?s level degree in Engineering and/or Science from an accredited U.S. university or college.
  • Have a 3.5 GPA or better at the Master's level.

As part of the admission review process, prospective candidates must submit:

  • A completed Stevens online Doctoral Fellowship Application Form.
  • Copies of all official college transcripts (Undergraduate and Master?s degrees).
  • GRE Scores
  • Statement of Purpose (five pages, single spaced) describing the candidate?s research interests and his/her maritime homeland security career objectives.
  • Three letters of recommendation from current professors, academic advisors, and/or employers.

Admission: Completed applications will be reviewed on a rolling admission basis.  

Contact: Interested candidates should contact Beth Austin DeFares, Director of Education, CSR, via email at bdefares@stevens.edu or by phone at 201.216.5362.

DHS Career Development Grant Recipients

Stevens in coordination with the Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR) have been awarded three consecutive DHS Career Development Grants (DHS CDG) to support nine full-time graduate students through Stevens Maritime Systems Master's Degree program, with a concentration in Maritime Security.
 
To date, Stevens has awarded eight fellowships.  Recipients of Stevens Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowships include:
2012 DHS CDG Award
Hasan Shahid: Hasan was awarded a Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship following the completion of his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology in May 2014.  Hasan was a participant in the CSR's 2011 Summer Research Institute and served as a team leader for the 2014 Summer Research Institute's Technology Integration and Synergies research team.  His research interests include secure wireless information systems. 
 
Nicholas Haliscak: Nicholas was awarded a DHS-funded Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship at Stevens Institute of Technology to begin his studies in January 2014.  Nicholas' research interests include unmanned systems with an emphasis on programming.  He was a DHS HS-STEM summer intern at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, where he updated hardware and software for a Portable Environmental Monitoring System, during the summer of 2013.  Nick's research background includes experience in the areas of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Robotics. Haliscak received his bachelor's in Mechanical Engineering at Texas A&M University- Kingsville, with a minor in Mathematics and Homeland Security. During the summer of 2014, Nicholas participated as a team member on the Summer Research Institute Maritime Scenario Development team.
 
2011 DHS CDG Award
Christopher Polacco: Chris was awarded a Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship during the summer of 2013.  Chris graduated from Stevens Institute of Technology in May 2013, with a degree in Chemical Engineering. Chris served as the team leader for the CSR 2014 Summer Research Institute Maritime Scenario Development team, where he and his teammates collaborated with Homeland Security practitioners to develop maritime incident scenarios for use by local, municipal, state and federal emergency responders in training and preparedness exercises.
 
Alexander Pollara: Alex Pollara was awarded a DHS CDG Master's Degree Fellowship award in 2012.  He completed his Master's degree in Maritime Systems with a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security in May 2014, following the defense of his Master's Thesis entitled Application of Portable Passive Acoustic System for Boat Detection and Classification.  Alex's research interests and work center around the tracking and identification of vessels based on their passive acoustic signatures, particularly focusing on the use of machine learning for vessel classification. During the summer of 2013 Alex interned at USCG Sector NY where he began an ongoing effort to incorporate third party camera feeds into the Coast Guard's new Watchkeeper platform. Alex's research has also led to the development of a compact portable hydrophone array designed to monitor vessel traffic around maritime infrastructure. Tests of this system have been successfully carried out at the Verrazano Bridge and on the Upper New York Harbor. Alex holds a Bachelor's Degree in Naval Engineering with a minor in Coastal Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology.  Alex was recently awarded a Doctoral Fellowship in Maritime Security, to continue his research at Stevens in the area of passive acoustic detection systems.
 
Grace Python: Grace Python completed her DHS-funded Maritime Systems Fellowship in December 2013.  Prior to her completing her degree in Maritime Systems at Stevens Institute of Technology, Grace completed a Master's Thesis entitled Decision Making Guidelines to Enhance Port Resilience to Flood Events.  Grace is currently employed by Analytic Services Inc, within the Analyst Development Program.  Prior to joining Analytic Services, Grace was employed as a Research Associate within the Center for Decision Technologies at Stevens Institute of Technology, where she conducted research on decision support frameworks for the U.S. Coast Guard and related Port partners.
 
During the summer of 2013, Grace participated in a ten week internship with the U.S. Coast Guard Atlantic Area Operations Analysis Division in Portsmouth, VA, where she conducted risk assessments and data analysis for determining optimal solutions for the deployment of Coast Guard assets. (e.g. vessels, personnel, technologies, etc.) At the completion of her internship, VADM Parker presented her with the Atlantic Area Command coin and the USCG Commitment to Excellence Award.
 
2010 DHS CDG Award
Christopher Francis: Christopher Francis is a 2013 graduate of the Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship program at Stevens Institute of Technology.  He received his bachelor's degree in Naval Engineering in 2011, also from Stevens, and is currently a research scientist participating in the Visiting Researcher Programme at the NATO Science & Technology Organization's Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (STO CMRE) in La Spezia, Italy.  His work there on STO CMRE's Talon-13 project mirrors his educational background in the Fellowship program, his experience in CSR's 2011 Summer Research Institute, and his experience as a summer intern at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport, RI in 2012.  His current research at STO CMRE lies in the area of maritime/port security, specifically small boat and swimmer defense, through the utilization of various remote-sensing technologies (both subsurface and airborne) and non-lethal weapons/effectors for protecting waterside infrastructure and waterborne assets.
 
Brandon Gorton: Brandon Gorton is currently a Deputy Physical Protection Expert in the Physical Protection Implementation Group - Global Threat Reduction Initiative of the National Security Directorate at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.  As part of this appointment, Mr. Gorton conducts security assessments and vulnerability-risk analyses to determine security enhancement recommendations to secure radiological and nuclear materials throughout the world.  In this capacity, he plays a critical role in technically complex, internationally critical global projects within the Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Sector by performing technical reviews, surveying quality and timeliness of hardware installation, evaluating contractor proposals, and assessing new technologies.
 
Danielle Holden: Danielle Holden is a 2013 graduate of the Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship program at Stevens Institute of Technology. She is currently employed at DNV GL in Houston, TX, as a Risk Analyst Consultant in the Oil and Gas sector within the Environmental and Navigational risk advisory group.
 
Prior to Stevens, Danielle completed a B.S. in Physical Oceanography, with a minor in Mathematics from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ. At Stevens, her research focused on evaluating operational, safety/security and infrastructural risks associated with the introduction of liquefied natural gas (LNG)-fueled ships into the U.S. maritime system.

Research and Facilities

Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR)

Established in 2008, the National Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR) serves as the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) lead port security research and education center, delivering educational programs, conducting innovative research, and developing new technologies to enhance our nation's maritime security, and safeguard populations and properties unique to U.S. islands, ports, and remote and extreme environments.

As part of its' mission, the CSR actively serves to develop and enhance our nation's maritime domain awareness and security capabilities by transferring its research into highly relevant graduate education, professional development programs, and innovative K-12 programs and workshops. www.stevens.edu/CSR

The Center for Maritime Systems

The Center for Maritime Systems works to preserve and secure our nation's maritime resources and assets through collaborative knowledge development, innovation and invention, and education and training. This Center has become the world's leader in delivering new knowledge, advanced technology, and education in support of the maritime community.It uniquely integrates the fields of naval architecture, coastal and ocean engineering, physical oceanography, marine hydrodynamics and maritime security to create a trans-disciplinary enterprise that can address both the highly-specialized issues confronting each discipline, as well as the more complex, integrated issues facing natural and man-made maritime systems. The inclusion of undergraduate and graduate students in this collaborative research endeavor continues the Stevens tradition of Technogenesis® - where students, faculty and industry jointly nurture new technologies to the benefit of society. The Center is composed of four integrated laboratory activities and three support groups. Point of Contact: Dr. Alan F. Blumberg (ablumber@stevens.edu)

The Maritime Security Laboratory

The Maritime Security Laboratory (MSL) researches, develops and evaluates technologies aimed at detecting and characterizing current and emerging maritime threats.  MSL addresses threats across multiple timescales, ranging from human-planned attacks to coastal hazards using assets including acoustic and infrared sensors; vessels and vehicles; and prediction tools focused on the surface, underwater, and urban realms.

In-harbor protection requires layered, sophisticated technologies for detection and characterization of surface and submerged intruders ' often in highly variable estuarine environments.  MSL has substantial expertise understanding and operating in complex urban estuaries and harbors where currents, salinity, temperature, water level, vessel traffic, and acoustic properties fluctuate strongly in space and rapidly in time.

Through close collaboration with government agencies, our R&D approaches are aimed to secure harbors throughout the world for anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR).

Stevens's Davidson Laboratory is one of the world's leading ocean engineering and naval architecture research facilities. The laboratory conducts physical model (towing tank) and computer model studies of marine craft and ocean structures, as well as model studies and field investigations of marine environmental problems such as contaminated sediment transport and oil spill fate and effects. The laboratory's research facilities are among the largest of any university in the nation, and include a 320 foot long high-speed towing tank and a 75 foot square maneuvering basin. The laboratory's fieldwork capabilities are provided by two fully-equipped coastal and estuary research vessels and a full compliment of oceanographic instrumentation.

The Center for Environmental Engineering assists industry, government and environmental service organizations by providing research and testing services to develop and apply innovative environmental technologies. The James C. Nicoll, Jr. Environmental Laboratory is a state-of-the-art facility that includes a large, high-bay process testing laboratory and fully automated instrumentation for the analysis of organic and inorganic materials and metals.

The Faculty

  • Thomas Wakeman, Research Professor and Deputy Director, Center for Maritime Systems
  • Barry Bunin, Distinguished Service Professor and Chief Architect, Maritime Security Laboratory
  • Michael S. Bruno, Professor and Dean, Charles V. Schaefer Jr. School of Engineering and Science, and Director, Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR), ScD, PE, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Civil-Ocean Engineering.
  • Raju Datla, Associate Scientist, Davidson Laboratory, PhD, Stevens Institute of Technology, Civil-Ocean Engineering.
  • Dimitri Donskoy, Associate Professor and Associate Director, Davidson Laboratory, Ph.D. Institute of Applied Physics, Gorky, USSR.
  • Thomas O. Herrington, Research Assistant Professor and Assistant Director, New Jersey Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service, PhD, Stevens Institute of Technology, Civil-Ocean Engineering.

The Challenge

The Maritime Systems (MS) Master's degree program has been organized to provide today's students with a graduate education in the areas of maritime industry, engineering, and management activities to stimulate and enhance their capacity for success.

Graduates of the program are equipped to address the many profound challenges facing the global maritime transportation industry. Some of the key issues include:

  • Transformation of the industry to an end-to-end logistic system of interconnected elements that comprise the Maritime Transportation System (MTS);
  • Competition among global supply chains occurring as the MTS emerges from the global economic crisis and its transformational demands;
  • and The heightened requirements for environmental concerns, as well as safety and security concerns imposed by terrorism, piracy, and other criminal activities impacting the MTS.

There are six areas ("Tracks") of emphasis for students to develop their knowledge and capabilities, including studies focused on Environmental Issues, Management Disciplines, Marine Transportation, Security Operations and Technologies, Maritime Structures, and Systems Engineering.

Courses

  • OE 501 Oceanography
  • OE 505 Introduction to Maritime Systems
  • OE 525 Principles of Naval Architecture
  • OE 526 Computer-Aided Aspect of Naval Architecture
  • OE 527 Laboratory in Naval Architecture
  • OE 528 Computer-Aided Ship Design
  • OE 529 Maritime Safety and Security
  • OE 530 Yacht Design
  • OE 560 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing
  • OE 589 Coastal Engineering
  • OE 610 Marine Transportation
  • OE 612 Environmental Issues in Maritime Systems
  • OE 614 Economic Issues in Maritime Systems
  • OE 618 HAZMAT Spill Response Planning
  • OE 620 Design of Marine Structures
  • OE 622 Design of Port Structures I
  • OE 623 Design of Port Structures II
  • OE 626 Port Planning and Development
  • OE 628 Technologies for Maritime Security
  • OE 629 Advanced Maritime Security
  • OE 630 Hydrodynamics
  • OE 637 Estuarine Oceanography
  • OE 642 Motion of Vessels in Waves
  • OE 643 Stability and Control of Marine Craft
  • OE 688 Coastal Ocean Dynamics I

Online programs and courses

If you're a professional with a bachelor's degree, you can earn a Graduate Certificate or a Master's degree in an online Maritime Systems program delivered by the same faculty who teach in conventional on-campus settings. You receive the finest professional education using rich Internet features -- threaded discussions, chat, bulletin boards, e-mail, file sharing, whiteboards, and workgroups for in-depth participation. You also have online library privileges, with instant search and retrieval of important databases. To learn more about the Maritime Systems graduate courses and certificates available online via Stevens WebCampus, please visit the following web link: www.stevens.edu/WebCampus

Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship

Stevens Institute of Technology in conjunction with the Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR) have been awarded a third DHS Career Development Grant to support additional full-time Master's Degree Fellowships in Maritime Systems with a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security, starting Spring or Summer 2015.

FELLOWSHIP OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the fellowship program is to enhance the knowledge base, technical skills, and leadership capabilities of our nation's future maritime security workforce and to provide greater access and support for U.S. students pursuing a homeland security focused Master's Degree in Maritime Systems. This fellowship program  will create enhanced experiential opportunities and direct pathways for highly skilled students to obtain technical leadership positions in the maritime security domain.

FELLOWSHIP ACTIVITIES:

Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowships include full-tuition and stipends. Students will participate in the following activities as part of their 24-month fellowship program:

  • Full-time enrollment in the Master's Degree program.
  • Complete required courses for the Master's Degree in Maritime Systems and the Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security, including a six-credit Master's Thesis.
  • Engage in a 10 week summer research internship in the field at an industry, or government homeland security organization.
  • Attend at least one DHS Science & Technology (S&T) Education & Career Fair.
  • Participate in Stevens career development workshops and career fairs.
  • Participate in the CSR's eight-week Summer Research Institute.
  • Meet regularly with assigned Stevens Academic Adviser and the Fellowship Coordinator.

CRITERIA FOR ADMISSION:

To be considered an applicant for the Maritime Systems fellowship program, candidates must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a U.S. Citizen.
  • Have a cumulative undergraduate GPA of 3.30 or better.
  • Possess an undergraduate degree in Engineering or anticipate completion of the degree by December 2014 or May 2015.
  • In the process of applying, or have already been formally admitted, into the Master's Degree program in Maritime Systems at Stevens Institute of Technology.
  • Commit to full-time enrollment during the tenure of their fellowship award and committed to a minimum of one year of employment in the homeland security workforce following the completion of their degree.
  • Upon admission into the Fellowship program, students will be required to sign an Agreement to Participate form.

Women and students from underrepresented communities are encouraged to apply.

Required Master's Degree Courses: The fellowship degree program consists of three components: 1) Four required core courses, 2) A four-course sequence leading to a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security, and 3) a Master's thesis. 

Core Course Requirements (4 courses, 12 credits)

Students will select four out of the following five courses to satisfy the program?s core course requirements:

  • OE 505 Introduction to Maritime Systems
  • OE 501 Oceanography
  • OE 610 Marine Transportation
  • OE 612 Environmental Issues in Maritime Systems
  • OE 614 Economic Issues in Maritime Systems

Elective Requirements (4 courses, 12 credits) Students will complete a four-course sequence leading to a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security. The course content of the Maritime Security graduate certificate is closely aligned with the Department of Homeland Security?s high-priority technology and security workforce needs, and will serve to complete the program?s remaining four elective course requirements:

  • OE 529 Maritime Safety & Security
  • OE 560 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing
  • OE 628 Technologies for Maritime Security
  • OE 629 Advanced Maritime Security

 Master's Thesis (6 credits) Fellowship students are required to complete a master's thesis consisting of an in-depth and original research project conducted in collaboration with the student?s faculty advisor/research mentor. The master?s thesis serves as the capstone of the fellowship program and is intended to be the culmination of the student?s research activities and experiences conducted throughout their degree program. (OE 900 Master's Thesis).

FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION FORM:

Applications for the Maritime Systems Master's Degree Fellowship will be handled through an online admissions process only. 

APPLY NOW!  Click here to complete the online FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION .

Applicants will be required to submit the following items as part of the application process.

  • College/University Transcript(s)
  • Two Letters of Recommendation (from current or former academic advisors/professors) 
  • Essay (5 to 10 pages/12pt font and 1.5 line spaced) The fellowship essay must address the following areas:
    • Tell us about yourself.
    • Why do you want to pursue study in the field of Maritime Systems and Maritime Security?
    • What are your career goals?
    • Tell us about your commitment to engage in full-time study and your willingness to work a minimum of one year in the maritime homeland security domain following the end of the Fellowship program.

DEADLINE FOR APPLYING:

Applications for the fellowship program are reviewed on a rolling admission process. Please contact bdefares@stevens.edu for important details on submitting your application and materials.

Contact:

To learn more about the Fellowship program, please contact Beth Austin DeFares, Director of Education, Center for Secure and Resilient Maritime Commerce (CSR) at bdefares@stevens.edu or by phone 201.216.5362.

Maritime Security Doctoral Fellowship

Stevens Institute of Technology is pleased to offer full-time fellowship opportunities for qualified students entering the Master of Science degree program in Maritime Systems with a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security.  Funding for the graduate fellowship program is being provided through a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Career Development Grant.

Fellowship Form

Stevens Institute of Technology is pleased to offer full-time fellowship opportunities for qualified students entering the Master of Science degree program in Maritime Systems with a Graduate Certificate in Maritime Security.  Funding for the graduate fellowship program is being provided through a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Career Development Grant.

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