2013 I&E Summer Scholars Projects - Systems & Enterprises

  1. Current State of Software Engineering Education in the US

    There are currently about 108 academic programs in software engineering in the US, 46 undergraduate and 62 graduate. Although many of these programs are consistent with current curriculum guidelines, it is not clear how closely those guidelines are being followed. For example, the most recent update to the graduate guidelines, GSwE2009, includes suggested material on systems engineering topics that may not be wide-spread. The purpose of this project is to assess the current state of the majority of the academic programs, similar to the work done by the GSwERC project in 2008:  "The Current State of Software Engineering Masters Degree Programs", by Arthur Pyster, Richard Turner, Devanandham Henry, Kahina Lasfer, and Lawrence Bernstein, presents the findings of a survey conducted by the EST on the current status of SwE Masters degree programs in the U.S.  This paper was presented at the 21st IEEE-CS Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEET) in April 2008.

    Advisor: Dr. Mark Ardis
    mardis@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5143

  2. Commonality Analysis of Engineering Lifecycle Models for Capstone Courses

    Most engineering programs require their students to follow a standard engineering lifecycle process on their capstone projects. For example, students may be required to produce standard requirements specifications and may be required to hold standard reviews of their progress. Unfortunately, these processes vary greatly from discipline to discipline and from school to school. The purpose of this project is to identify those aspects of most engineering processes that are commonly used across disciplines and across campuses. The goal is to identify a core process that can be used for multi-disciplinary projects in as many places as possible.

    Advisor: Dr. Mark Ardis
    mardis@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5143

  3. Smart City Hoboken

    Leveraging crowd-sourcing through smart devices and data collected through embedded sensors, Smart cities provide residents and city government with the ability to leverage information for improved decision-making.  We are looking for students who help us develop performance dashboards for citizens and city government, presenting real-time data in a way that makes sense to these stakeholders.  The research would include developing an architecture for such an effort and its development.  Knowledge of Java a must. 

    Advisor: Dr. Ali Mostashari
    amostash@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8723

  4. Researching Adaptive Robot Behaviors in a Simulation Environment

    Using open-source architecture and programming languages and tools, assist our programming team in developing and extending our simulation environment using adaptive software robots to analyze and affect interactions and adaptations via the control loop activities of data collection, analysis, decision, and action.  The current system uses Eclipse, Ruby, and GitHub.  Programming experience in any or all of these tools is desirable.

    Advisor: Dr. Mark Blackburn
    mblackbu@stevens.edu
    Ext: 3307

  5. Sustainable Energy

    Using a serious gaming environment and MatLab, examine the environmental impact, cost, usability, etc., of various innovative uses of sustainable energy systems. Residential and business environments will be examined and modeled, and multiple configurations of energy systems examined.  Programming knowledge preferable, knowledge of C# would be ideal.

    Advisor: Dr. Robert Cloutier
    rcloutie@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5378

  6. Using Graphical CONOPS for Healthcare Delivery Analysis

    Using an existing serious gaming platform which explores the concept of operations for a scenario, develop a new domain for healthcare delivery analysis and adaptation.  Create visual representations of operating room activities and actors, emergency room situations, and a hospital wing devoted to patient care.  Background support systems can also be modeled including: maintenance, food service, physical therapy, testing and imaging, etc.  Programming knowledge preferable, knowledge of C# would be ideal.

    Advisor: Dr. Robert Cloutier
    rcloutie@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5378

  7. Alleviating Voting Inadequacies through Data Visualization and Operations Research

    President Obama mandated in the state of the union to create a "non-partisan commission to improve the voting experience in America."   This project, using decision analysis techniques and visualization tools for optimization, will actualize the vision of President Obama to improve voting experience through the development of a decision making framework.  Programming skills in R-Visualization and Python preferable; an ability to mathematically model and optimize is required.

    Advisor: Dr. Jose Ramriez-Marquez
    jmarquez@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8003

  8. Smartphone Mobile App Interface to Stevens Financial Data Services (SFDS)

    The Stevens Financial Engineering Program is developing a novel data service for storing, visualizing, and analyzing company financial disclosures from filed to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). All these public disclosures are captured using a machine readable language called eXtensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL). The importance of the XBRL SEC filings lies with the fact that the contents represent a company’s fundamental value, and they are the most important piece of intelligence to an investor. Currently, SFDS is building an infrastructure to deliver key financials, competitor comparison analysis results and metrics for every company listed with the SEC. Application of text mining, twitter sentiment analysis and relevant social-network techniques will be used to provide investors with a new level of intelligence in investing in the financial markets.

    Outcomes: Conference Presentation, Proof-of-concept

    Advisor: Dr. Steve Yang
    steve.yang@stevens.edu
    Ext: 3394

  9. Studying the Risk and Reliability in the Fractionated Satellite Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    In monolithic satellites the reliability of the whole system is a simple multiplication of the reliability of its modules. A fractionated satellite, which is a new concept in designing satellites, is composed of a set of physically dependent modules that work together to deliver the requirements of the system. As a result, the reliability of the services in this satellite is a complex probability distribution of the reliability of its components, and the dependency between its modules. The aim of this project is to create a Monte Carlo simulation to study the reliability of each service in a fractionated satellite.

    References:

    • Simulation, Sheldon M. Ross or any other textbook about Monte Carlo Simulation
    • Fractionated Space Architectures: Tracing the Path to Reality, Owen Brown, Paul Eremenko, Matt Bille
    • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractionated_spacecraft

    Student Requirements:Conducting this research requires programming skills and the ability to design a Monte Carlo simulation. The knowledge of probability is a must, but knowing reliability in systems is not necessary.

    Benefits:This project is a part of cutting edge research on Fractionated Satellites. The student can solidify her or his simulation capabilities, learn about applied architecture design, and also learn about reliability in systems.

    Advisor: Linda Laird
    linda_m_laird@msn.com
    Ext: 8649

     

  10. Studying the Behavior of a System using a non-traditional control system based upon Human-like Decision Patterns

    The majority of our systems are controlled by deterministic algorithms. This project will implement a novel set of control algorithms into an open source project and study the changes in behavior.
    The objectives of this research are
    • Understand the difficulty of implementing a limited set of human-like thought patterns in an existing system
    • Observe the resulting behavior of the system

    Student Requirements:This research requires good programming skills and the ability solve unstructured problems independently. Some statistical background is a plus.

    Benefits:The student can participate in a leading-edge research project in systems research. The student will learn about different decision making models.

    Advisor: Linda Laird
    linda_m_laird@msn.com
    Ext: 8649

     

  11. Analytics of XBRL-based financial disclosure information using R

    The project is part of the proposed XBRL infrastructure system currently in development by the Financial Engineering department. The objective of the system is to apply various analytic techniques such as statistics and data mining on publicly available financial disclosure information (e.g. General Electric's annual report). This system provides a platform for investors to utilize our analytic results for better informed decision making, and, most importantly, for academia community to conduct financial disclosure-related research. The project will focus on the use of R (a statistical software package) in generating meaningful analytic results and connecting with the main XBRL infrastructure system through an extension plugin. Through this project, you can learn and explore the different functions available in R and subsequently apply them to various sets of financial disclosure information of interest.

    Special Student Qualifications:

    • (Required) Basic knowledge of R
    • All majors welcome for application
    • Strong interest in conducting research related to the financial market stability and regulation
    • Intermediate to advanced Math/Statistics knowledge required
    • Creativity demonstrated through previous project work
    • Able to work independently and to communicate effectively

    Number of students required: 1-2 students

    Advisor: Dr. Steve Yang
    steve.yang@stevens.edu
    Ext: 3394