2010 Technogenesis Projects - Engineering

  1. Wave Energy Harnessing Device- Engineering Internship

    Join the researchers at the Center for Maritime Systems in the development of Stevens patented Wave Energy Harnessing Device (WEHD). Intern work will include developing as-built drawings of the WEHD in Solidworks, participating in wave tank tests, and analyzing test data.

    Advisor: Michael Raftery
    mraftery@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8704

  2. Wave Energy Harnessing Device- Business Internship

    Join researchers at the Center for Maritime Systems and the Howe School of Business in developing a business plan for Stevens' patented Wave Energy Harnessing Device (WEHD). Intern work will include researching the state of the emerging wave energy industry and developing a business plan for the WEHD.

    Advisor: Michael Raftery
    mraftery@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8704

  3. Design of an Intraocular Pressure (IOP) Sensor

    Glaucoma is a disease affecting millions of people in the US alone every year. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the most common cause of glaucoma, slowly kills the optic nerve starting from the outside and progressing to the inside. The management of glaucoma lies primarily in early diagnosis and careful monitoring of the condition to prevent further optic neuropathy. Our ultimate goal is to develop a prototype of a pressure sensor to be implantable and accurate enough to continuously or on demand monitor the intraocular pressure. The research proposed will ultimately lead to a device that would control automatically the IOP and keeps it below a certain level at all times, thus preventing the onset of glaucoma and saving millions of eyesights. As a preliminary step of this work, the students will participate in the literature search, case study, material selection, and preliminary design of such an implantable microsensor. This study will detail some of the technical components reported via US Patent #7,131,945 B2, entitled “Optically Powered And Optically Data-Transmitting Wireless Intraocular Pressure Sensor Device”. This work is to support on going collaboration with University of Arizona.

    Advisor: E. H. Yang

    Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
    eyang@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8213
  4. Design of a Piezoelectric Miocrovalve for NASA’s Mass Spectrometer Applications

    Microvalves can be used for precision gas and chemical flow control for semiconductor manufacturing, precision dispensing for the life science applications and for applications in micro total analysis systems. Specifically this summer project is targetted for obtaining a pathfinder design of such a microvalve for NASA’s mass spectrometers.

    http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/a010000/a010200/a010206/

    As a preliminary step of this work, the students will participate in the literature search, case study, material selection, and preliminary design of such a microvalve. This design study will build on technologies appeared in ipp.nasa.gov/innovation/innovation115/5-opportunity.html. This summer project will partially support our joint research effort with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

    Advisor: E. H. Yang
    Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering
    eyang@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8213

  5. Inkjet-Printed Silver Nanoparticle Assemblies for Dental Applications

    The goal of this project is to develop a novel biomaterial solution to the bacterial infection of dental implants and orthodontic devices. One of the promising solutions is to print and micropattern sliver nanoparticle assemblies, as an avenue of preventing the formation of oral biofilms to the surface of these surfaces. In the first half this project, the student is expected to spend 4 weeks this summer at the University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands to learn how to prepare and culture oral bacteria at UMCG. In the second half of the project, the student will use the culture techniques at Stevens to evaluate the efficacy of the inkjet-printed micropatterns.

    Advisor: Prof. Woo Lee
    Department of Chemical Engineering & Material Sciences
    woo.lee@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8307

  6. Droplet Dynamics on Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    The objective of this project is to investigate a liquid droplet dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces. Nature such as plants and insects uses micro- and nano-textured surfaces in their components (e.g., leaves, wings, eyes, and legs) for multi-purposes such as self-cleanness. Such multi-functional surface properties are attributed to the 3D surface structures. Especially, hydrophobic surface structures create a composite interface with liquid by retaining air between the structures, minimizing the contact area with liquid. Such non-wetting surface property, so-called superhydrophobicity, can offer numerous application potentials including anti-fogging, anti-snow adhesion, anti-frosting, anti-corrosion, low flow-friction, and anti-biofouling. In this project, we will test contact angles, evaporation kinetics, wetting dynamics, and dryout deposition patterns of various liquids on biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Number of students who could potentially participate: 1

    Advisor: Chang-Hwan Choi
    Department: Mechanical Engineering
    cchoi@stevens.edu
    Ext:5579

  7. 7. Design of Mechanical Icing Adhesion Tester

    The objective of this project is to design and construct an instrument to test icing adhesion. Icing is a serious issue in civil and mechanical systems such as airplanes. On airplanes, ice develops across the entire fuselage and on the leading edges of the wings. When severe ice builds up on the wings, it affects the effective shape of the wings and can lead to boundary layer separation, which reduces the wings’ ability to create lift. This is a serious issue and has been attributed to many accidents involving smaller aircraft. NASA, Boeing, and the militaries have spent millions of dollars a year researching methods to reduce the ice build-up. However, the research has mostly involved mechanical and thermal systems for deicing mechanism rather than anti-icing materials. In this project, we will develop experimental instrument to measure the mechanical adhesion of icing on surfaces to characterize various anti-icing materials.

    Number of students who could potentially participate: 1

    Advisor: Chang-Hwan Choi
    Department: Mechanical Engineering
    cchoi@stevens.edu
    Ext:5579

  8. Computer Algebra for Cryptography on Graphics Cards

    The goal of this project is to implement a number of different computer algebra algorithms which are used in the context of cryptography on NVIDIA Telsa C1060 cards. Examples include factoring, solving of the discrete logarithm problem, and lattice basis reduction.

    Interested students should have taken classes in computer algebra or cryptography and should have programming experience.

    Advisors: Susanne Wetzel and Werner Backes
    Department : Computer Science
    susanne.wetzel@stevens.edu
    werner.backes@stevens.edu

  9. Privacy-preserving Policy Reconciliation

    In order to enable interaction it is necessary that the respective parties agree on the terms that will govern the interaction. This negotiation process is generally referred to as policy reconciliation. We have developed some new protocols which allow for policy reconciliation to be carried out in a manner which respects a parties preferences and privacy.

    The goal of this summer project is to implement some components of these new protocols in C++. Prerequisites for the project are good programming skills and some basic knowledge in security.

    Advisor: Susanne Wetzel
    Department: Computer Science
    susanne.wetzel@stevens.edu

  10. Production of alternative fuels over cobalt nanoparticles

    Although Fischer-Tropsch catalysis has been known for more than 80 years, information on the fundamentals of this chemistry is limited, hindering development of alternative energy sources. To address the fundamentals of the fuel synthesis, model catalysts based on cobalt nanoparticles supported on titania will be studied with multiple experimental techniques, focusing on dynamic changes in surface species with infrared spectroscopy. Experimental information will be used to establish the basis for selection of models and the level of theory for density functional theory (DFT) quantum-chemical calculations. In turn, results of the DFT calculations with vibrational analyses will allowed us to identify appropriate surface models, better interpret experimental data and provide reaction mechanism information at nanoscale.

    Advisor: Simon Podkolzin
    Associate Professor
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
    Simon.Podkolzin@stevens.edu
    Tel.: 201-216-8074
    Fax: 201-482-5424

  11. Novel Non-viral Gene Transfer Vectors

    The ability to introduce genes into the nucleus of target cells has potential applications as a therapy for genetic diseases or as a delivery mechanism for therapeutic proteins. Genetically engineered viruses are highly efficient in terms of delivering DNA to the nucleus of target cells. However, their complement of foreign proteins stimulates an immune system leading to the development of antibodies that prevent future administration of the same virus. Chemical and physical methods to accomplish gene delivery are being developed, but generally fail to exhibit efficient delivery of DNA to the nucleus compared with viruses. This Technogenesis project will focus on the development of a new system gene transfer that will mimic viral infection without using immunogenic proteins. Elements of the project will include genetic engineering to accomplish assembly, targeting, intracellular transport, and disassembly of the complex within the cell.

    Advisor: Philip Leopold
    Department: Chemistry, Chemical Biology, & Biomedical Engineering
    pleopold@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8957

  12. Gene Transfer Properties of Carotenoid Lipids

    Cationic lipids have been used extensively to enhance delivery of genes into cells by virtue of the ability of the positively charged lipid to interact with negatively charged DNA. Working with collaborators in Doha, Qatar, and Trondheim, Norway, our laboratory is characterizing the gene transfer properties of a new family of lipids based on carotenoids, naturally occurring, highly unsaturated lipids that collect light energy in plants. The lipids will be used in formulations with other cationic and zwitterionic lipids in cell culture experiments.

    Advisor: Philip Leopold
    Department: Chemistry, Chemical Biology, & Biomedical Engineering
    pleopold@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8957

  13. Respiratory Protection for the 21st Century

    History teaches us that inhalation of nano- or micro-fibers has the potential for pulmonary toxicity. This lesson is perhaps most poignant when considering the health effects of asbestos inhalation leading to asbestosis and mesothelioma. Due to the extensive use of asbestos in buildings in the last century, asbestos exposure is still a concern during construction, demolition, and particularly, emergency settings such as fires. Scientists and engineers are currently poised to launch new technologies based on a similarly stable nano-fiber, the carbon nanotube. Early toxicity testing indicates that nanotubes may share some of the pulmonary effects of asbestos fibers. This Technogenesis project will explore novel biologic approaches that could protect individuals at risk for inhalation exposure to stable nano- or micro-fibers.

    Advisor: Philip Leopold
    Department: Chemistry, Chemical Biology, & Biomedical Engineering
    pleopold@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8957

  14. Cellular Changes following Traumatic Brain Injury

    During traumatic brain injury, neurons experience linear and angular acceleration that results in distortion of brain tissue, tearing of the fragile axonal extensions of neuron (a condition known as "diffuse neuronal injury"), and, eventually, dying back of axons. The aspects of traumatic brain injury from the point of diffuse brain injury to the point of the axonal dying back response are similar to changes that occur in certain neurodegenerative diseases or viral infections of neurons. In those cases, previous studies show that one contributor to axon dying back is the fact that intracellular molecular motors of the kinesin family are turned off. As a result, newly synthesized biomolecules cannot re-supply the axon. The mechanism of axonal dying back has not been determined in traumatic brain injury; hence, this project will focus on the state of activity of kinesin motor molecules following traumatic brain injury.

    Advisor: Philip Leopold
    Department: Chemistry, Chemical Biology, & Biomedical Engineering
    pleopold@stevens.edu
    Ext : 8957

  15. Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on biomaterials surfaces

    A biofilm is an assemblage of microbial cells that is irreversibly associated with a surface. Bacteria in biofilm show unique physiological characteristics that are much different from planktonic cultured phenotypes. One of the most important features of bacterial biofilms is their resistance to antimicrobial agents and the host immune system attacks. We propose to fight against biofilm from a new direction by directly dealing with formed biofilms. In this project, we will construct functional polymer modified surfaces that can prevent bacterial adhesion and sensitize formed biofilms for antibiotic treatment.

    Advisor: James Liang
    Department: Chemistry, Chemical Biology, and Biomedical Engineering
    Jliang@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5640

  16. Production of alternative fuels over cobalt nanoparticles

    Although Fischer-Tropsch catalysis has been known for more than 80 years, information on the fundamentals of this chemistry is limited, hindering development of alternative energy sources. To address the fundamentals of the fuel synthesis, model catalysts based on cobalt nanoparticles supported on titania will be studied with multiple experimental techniques, focusing on dynamic changes in surface species with infrared spectroscopy. Experimental information will be used to establish the basis for selection of models and the level of theory for density functional theory (DFT) quantum-chemical calculations. In turn, results of the DFT calculations with vibrational analyses will allowed us to identify appropriate surface models, better interpret experimental data and provide reaction mechanism information at nanoscale.

    Advisor: Simon Podkolzin
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
    Simon.Podkolzin@Stevens.edu

Projects 2011

  1. Engineering
  2. Sciences
  3. Technology Management
  4. Systems & Enterprises
  5. College of Arts & Letters

For more information, please contact:

Ms. Sandra Furnbach
Coordinator of Academic Entrepreneurship Initiatives