2012 Technogenesis Projects - Science

  1. Antibiotic-Free Surface for Indwelling Devices Associated Infections

    Bacteria in biofilm show unique physiological characteristics that are much different from planktonic cultured phenotypes. One of the most important features of bacterial biofilms is their resistance to antimicrobial agents and the host immune system attacks. Biofilm associated nosocomial (hospital acquired) infection and disease is currently the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, behind only heart disease, cancer and stroke. Regardless what anti-biofilm methods are used, the success rates are very limited and biofilms will nevertheless form on implanted devices. In most cases, biofilm related infections can only be cured by a high cost and undesirable procedure through the removal of the implants. Our group is working on an approach to fight against biofilm from a new direction by dealing with attached bacteria and formed biofilms directly. The research involves the design and characterization of functional polymer grafted surfaces and testing the anti-biofilm activity of resulting surfaces using cultured bacterial cells.

    Advisor: Prof. James Liang
    Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology, and Biomedical Engineering
    email: jliang2@stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-5640

  2. Properties of Protein Complexes with Signaling Molecules and Model Systems and Computational Design Aspects of Efficient Detection Agents

    This project involves computational investigations of the structural, spectroscopic, and mechanistic properties of protein complexes with signaling molecules and models, part of our NIH project. 2-3 students can work, together with current graduate and undergraduate students in this lab. Students are required to have taken Ch321, and will receive rigorous professional research training.

    Advisor: Prof. Yong Zhang
    Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology, and Biomedical Engineering
    Email: yong.zhang@stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-5513

  3. Fabrication of Novel Nanofibers

    The project will utilize our state-of-the-art hybrid twin screw extrusion and electrospinning process for the fabrication of hyaluranic acid based biomaterials that can be used as tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Advisor: Prof. Dilhan M. Kalyon
    Department of Chemical Engineering; Materials Science
    Email: dkalyon@stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-8225

  4. The Effect of Tin Alloying on Reactivity of Acetylene

    Platinum-based catalysts are used in a wide variety of industrial hydrocarbon reactions, for example, in hydrogenation, reforming and oxidation. Tin is frequently added to platinum catalyst formulations as a promoter that suppresses hydrocarbon decomposition and improves reaction selectivities. The program objective is to understand at the molecular level the effect of tin alloying on reactivity of acetylene. The project is mostly computational (molecular modeling) with experiments performed at Princeton University.

    Advisor: Prof. Simon Podkolzin
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
    Email: Simon.Podkolzin@Stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-8074

  5. Identify the Molecular Structure of Oxygen Species active in Oxidation Reactions

    Silver nanoparticles supported are actively studied as catalysts for selective hydrocarbon oxidation: for example, for the conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide. The program objective is to identify the molecular structure of oxygen species active in oxidation reactions. The project is mostly computational (molecular modeling) with experiments performed at Lehigh University.

    Advisor: Prof. Simon Podkolzin
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
    Email: Simon.Podkolzin@Stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-8074

  6. Conversion of Natural Gas into Transportation Fuels or Chemical Feedstocks

    Methane conversion into valuable aromatic products represents a highly desirable route for conversion of natural gas into transportation fuels or chemical feedstocks. The nature of active sites in catalysts, such as molybdenum supported on ZSM-5 zeolite, however, is not well understood. The program objective is to identify the structure of active sites and determine reaction kinetics. This project has both experimental and computational parts. The experimental part involves synthesis and reaction testing of catalysts with molybdenum nanostructures.

    Advisor: Prof. Simon Podkolzin
    Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
    Email: Simon.Podkolzin@Stevens.edu
    Phone: (201)216-8074

  7. Static Analysis for Secure Information Flow in Android Apps

    Advisor: David Naumann
    Department of Computer Science
    Email: naumann@cs.stevens.edu
    Phone (201) 216-5608

  8. Dynamic Information Flow Analysis of JavaScript Web Applications and Mashups.

    Advisor: David Naumann
    Department of Computer Science
    Email: naumann@cs.stevens.edu
    Phone (201) 216-5608

  9. Computational Modeling for BioInnovation

    Computational modeling consists of creating a virtual world of phenomena we wish to study using computational means together with data from the real word. The model consists of an executable object where each run of the model produces a simulation of the real world. In the model we can alter conditions and behavior to explore conjectures or predict future outcomes. Computational modeling helps reduce the search space of experiments in the real world, reducing costs and shortening the time to discovery.

    Computational modeling has two aspects, on the one hand we are interested in developing models of complex phenomena where heterogeneous entities react to the environment in selective ways. On the other hand, we need modeling tools with attributes that help us capture the desired behavior.

    Compagnoni and her group have been working on both aspects of computational modeling. They designed and implemented BioScape a concurrent modeling language for the stochastic simulation of biological and biomedical processes, and they developed a number of models on di?erent modeling platforms.

    The group is currently working on models for signal transduction pathways for breast cancer and tuberculosis, anti-bacterial coatings for medical implants, biofilm development, viral tra?c, and personalized oncology treatments. The modeling e?orts are ongoing and there is ample room for collaboration with undergraduate students in all of them.

    The modeling platform is under development and open areas of research where undergraduate students will be welcome to participate include: a virtual lab for the combination and composition of experiments, a 3D rendering module, and a GUI for BioScape that would integrate an editor for model design, a control panel for the simulation of models, and an output area for the visualization of simulation results.

    Requirements: undergraduate students should have taken CS 496 or equivalent. Experience in computational modeling is not necessary.

    Advisor: Adriana Compagnoni
    Department of Computer Science
    Email: adriana.compagnoni@stevens.edu
    Phone: (201) 216-5046

  10. Research in Malware Analysis and Tracking

    Faculty in the Department of Computer Science seek to supervise projects that involve analysis of malicious software and their network manifestations. Specifically, there are opportunities to work with malware executables and network traces, e.g. for the purpose of botnet detection.

    The goal is to develop better code analysis techniques and tools, as well as to analyze and model the network behavior of malware.

    Advisor: Sven Dietrich
    Department of Computer Science
    Email: sevn.dietrich@stevens.edu
    Phone: (201) 216-8078