2011 Technogenesis Projects - Science

  1. Tissue Engineered Nerve Grafts for Nerve Regeneration

    The project will involve the design, preparation, and characterization of artificial nerve conduits.

    Advisor: Xiaojun Yu, Ph.D
    Department of Chemistry, Chemical Biology and Biomedical Engineering
    xyu@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5256

  2. 3D Computer Vision

    Summer research involved 3D reconstruction or LIDAR data analysis. The student must be a good programmer in C/C++. Previous research has been conducted in the past involving 3D reconstruction and LIDAR data analysis addressing the problem of extracting the road network from large-scale rance datasets. The approach taken on that project was fully automated and did not require any inputs other than depth and intensity measurements from the range sensor. For a general idea of possible summer research projects involving 3d reconstruction or LIDAR data analysis, please visit: http://www.cs.stevens.edu/~mordohai/research.html.

    Advisor: Philippos Mordohai
    Department of Computer Science
    Philippos.Morohai@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5611

  3. Simulation of Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguide Gyroscopes

    This project involves research in the Simulation of Coupled Resonator Optical Waveguide Gyroscopes. 1-2 students are needed with skills in Mathematica and/or Matlab, and linear algebra.

    Advisor: Christopher Search
    Christopher.Search@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5626

  4. Quantum Control of the Velocity for Index of Refraction Engineering

    This project research involves the study of Quantum Control of the Velocity of Light in Atomic Vapors for Index of Refraction Engineering, Optical Buffering, and All Optical Logic. 1-2 students are needed with skills in Mathematica, linear algebra, differential equations, some quantum theory.

    Advisor: Christopher Search
    Christopher.Search@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5626

  5. Simulation and Development of Nanoelectronic Graphene Devices

    This project involves the research in Simulation and Development of Nanoelectronic Graphene Devices Using KNIT Software (http://inac.cea.fr/Pisp/xavier.waintal/KNIT.php). 1-2 students are needed with skills in C++, Python, some solid state physics. (NOTE: This project depends on the availability over the summer of the PhD student who knows the software and is planning to defend his dissertation in May or June.)

    Advisor: Christopher Search
    Christopher.Search@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5626

  6. Modeling and Simulations in Biomechanics

    Stents are expandable meshed tubular scaffolds that are inserted into blocked or damaged blood vessels. They offer a practical way to treat coronary artery disease, repairing vessels and keeping them open so that blood can flow freely. When stents work, they are a great alternative to radical surgery. Biomechanical modeling and simulation of blood vessels and stents can help in determining optimal designs and materials for the stents in order to improve the biomechanical interaction of the stent and artery wall.

    An ongoing research project focuses on simulations of coronary stents with arbitrary geometry and arbitrary material under complex loading conditions. The students of the scholar program will be involved in the creation of 3D patient-specific models of arteries, designing cardiovascular stents, simulations of expansion, annealing and crimping of stents, and the subsequent deployment of the stent into vascular tissue.

    Research topics:

    1. Geometric and biomechanical features of the vascular system.
    2. Vascular geometry reconstruction.
    3. Geometric and mechanical modeling of cardiovascular stents.
    4. Biomechanics of stented artery and stent design optimization.
    5. Finite-element simulation of stent expansion.

    The project is targeted to students in biomedical engineering, (bio)physics, mechanical and civil engineering, applied mathematics and materials science whose interests are in the area of biomechanics.

    Number of positions: 2

    Qualifications: Basic experience with SolidWorks preferred. Some knowledge of ANSYS would be a plus.

    Advisor: Prof. Esche, Department of Mechanical Engineering
    SEsche@stevens.edu
    Ext: 5559

  7. Preparation of Substituted Isatins and the Synthesis of Novel Pharmcophores

    This research will focus on the preparation of substituted isatins, an important substrate in drug discovery. Furthermore, these substituted isatins will then be transformed into novel heterocycles such as ortho–ortho disubstituted biphenyls, which have been found to possess interesting biological activities (i.e. anti-Alzheimer’s and anti-cancer).

    This project will involve:

    • Microscale to gramscale multi-step solution phase organic synthesis.
    • Separation of reaction mixture using various chromatographic techniques (TLC, preparative TLC, flash chromatograph, chiral HPLC and recrystallization).
    • Structural analysis using MS, HRMS, FT-IR and NMR data such as 1H, 13C, APT(Attached Proton Test) , NOE (Nuclear Overhauser effect), COSY(Correlation Spectroscopy), HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence), HMBC (Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence), NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy) and HSQCTOXY (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence-Total Correlation Spectroscopy).

    Advisors: Dr. C. Wang/Dr. S. Alluri
    cwang@stevens.edu/salluri@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8175

  8. Enantioselective Synthesis of Physostigmine Alkaloid Analogs

    Physostigmine and physovenine, the alkaloids from the African Calabar bean, have interesting physiological effects such as anti-cholinergic and anti-mitotic activities. Recent studies have suggested that physostigmine and its derivatives are useful for relieving symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. In our lab, we are investigating efficient strategies for the synthesis of these alkaloids. In addition, we are also interested in developing enantioselective synthesis to make both the natural and unnatural enantiomers.

    This project will involve:

    • Microscale to gramscale multi-step solution phase organic synthesis.
    • Separation of reaction mixture using various chromatographic techniques (TLC, preparative TLC, flash chromatograph, chiral HPLC and recrystallization).
    • Structural analysis using MS, HRMS, FT-IR and NMR data such as 1H, 13C, APT(Attached Proton Test) , NOE (Nuclear Overhauser effect), COSY(Correlation Spectroscopy), HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence), HMBC (Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence), NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy) and HSQCTOXY (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence-Total Correlation Spectroscopy).

    Advisors: Dr. C. Wang/Dr. S. Alluri
    cwang@stevens.edu/salluri@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8175

  9. Synthesis of Novel HIV Proteases Inhibitors

    HIV proteases inhibitors have played a major role in increasing the average life expectancy in AIDS patients. A novel class of HIV protease inhibitors was designed in our lab based on a conformationally restricted sulfonamide pharmacophore. Our research interests in this project will focus on synthesizing a library of compounds by incorporating groups commonly found in drug-like molecules. All these compounds will be tested for their HIV protease inhibitory activity.

    This project will involve:

    • Microscale to gramscale multi-step solution phase organic synthesis.
    • Separation of reaction mixture using various chromatographic techniques (TLC, preparative TLC, flash chromatograph, chiral HPLC and recrystallization).
    • Structural analysis using MS, HRMS, FT-IR and NMR data such as 1H, 13C, APT(Attached Proton Test) , NOE (Nuclear Overhauser effect), COSY(Correlation Spectroscopy), HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence), HMBC (Heteronuclear Multiple Bond Coherence), NOESY (Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement Spectroscopy) and HSQCTOXY (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence-Total Correlation Spectroscopy).

    Advisors: Dr. C. Wang/Dr. S. Alluri
    cwang@stevens.edu/salluri@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8175

  10. New Generation Predictive Tools for Forest Management

    Objective: The overall project objective is to develop new forest management software that will be used as tool by foresters to predict outcomes of forest management practices and effects of climate change.

    Forest simulators are predictive tools for forest management employed by the forestry companies and USDA forest service. These models forecast dynamics by predicting each individual?s birth, dispersal, reproduction and death and how these events are affected by spatial competition for resources with neighbors. Recently we have developed a new generation forest simulator (Strigul et al., 2008, Ecological monographs, 78: 523-545). This simulator included essential features of two simulators, TASS and SORTIE, which have been widely used for practical forest management over the last 20 years, as well as a novel algorithm for the crown plasticity. The major objective of this project is to further develop this simulator as a working tool for forest management. This will include the following tasks:

    1. Introducing optimization tools for the forest management.
    2. Development of the output modules should also produce a ready-to-go economic prognosis for forest industry.

    Advisor: Dr. Nikolay Strigul
    nstrigul@stevens.edu
    Ext: 8763

  11. Mutual Authentication from a Fuzzy Signal

    The overall goal of the project is to develop and implement a protocol for mutual authentication or authenticated key sharing between two mobile devices.

    Students involved in the project will work on implementing working prototype which uses samples of images (such as photographs) as an initial point of the protocol. Further work will include the assessment of the security and applicability of such data in applications related to mobile devices.

    There are two main components involved:

    • Data acquisition, which requires developing tools based on an image processing and indexing.
    • Cryptographic part requires basic knowledge of algebra and number theory.
    • Students are welcome to participate in one of the topics above or both.

    The project is targeted towards computer science and mathematics students. Strong programming skills are required. Some knowledge of image/signal processing or basic cryptography would be useful.

    Advisors: A. Myasnikov, Dr. S. Wetzel
    amyasnik@stevens.edu, swetzel@cs.stevens.edu
    Ext: 8599/5610