2014 I&E Summer Scholars Projects - Engineering

1. DEVELOPMENT OF A SELF- CONTAINED AUTONOMOUS TOTAL ARTIFICIAL HEART

The objective of this project is to design and test a flow loop for evaluating the pressure-flow characteristics and control of a novel total artificial heart design. Students engaged in this project will learn and develop engineering principles in support of a very early stage prototype. The project is a collaborative research effort between Stevens Institute of Technology and the Hackensack University Medical Center. 

Advisor: Art Ritter
aritter@stevens.edu
X 8290

2. BIG DATA MANAGEMENT AND ANALYTICS IN CLOUD

I am interested in investigating  novel algorithms, software architectures, emerging computing platforms, and unique approaches to deal with Big data, including Big data applications on clouds, storage and management of Big data on clouds, and novel Big data algorithms and applications in all fields of science and engineering.

Advisor: Wendy Hui Wang
Hui.Wang@stevens.edu
X 8736

3. DATA SECURITY IN THE CLOUD

I am interested in investigating security issues related to cloud data management, including encryption, key management, access control, and security intelligence.

Advisor: Wendy Hui Wang
Hui.Wang@stevens.edu
X 8736

4. DATA SECURITY IN THE CLOUDHUMAN INDOOR MOBILITY PATTERN FOR ROBOT-ASSISTED ACTIVITIES

The project aims to investigate human mobility pattern in indoor environments such as shopping malls, museums and student dorms, based on which robotic systems can be designed to assist human activities in both normal situation and emergency evacuation.

Advisor: Yi Guo
yi.guo@stevens.edu 
X 5658

5.MICROPHYSIOLOGICAL HUMAN 3D TISSUE RECONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY

With recent advances at the intersection of tissue engineering and microfluidics, we envision the possibility of reproducing normal human tissue cell functions in vitro that mimic the native state of human tissue. Such technology platforms are expected to advance the drug development process as well as provide personalized ex vivo pathological models using patient biopsies. We believe such technologies provide a more relevant approach to:

  • Study how human tissue cells respond to drugs, pathogens, and trauma;
  • Reduce reliance on animal studies since they do not often predict human response;
  • Provide a path for the potential development of assays to assist in therapeutic decision-making. Obviously, this is our long-term vision with a 10-year time horizon. Students will be working on initial steps towards realizing this ambitious vision with particular focus on bone and bone marrow tissues.

Advisor: Woo Young Lee 
wlee@stevens.edu
X 8307

6.HUMAN INDOOR MOBILITY PATTERN FOR ROBOT-ASSISTED ACTIVITIES

The project aims to investigate human mobility pattern in indoor environments such as shopping malls, museums, and student dorms, based on which robotic systems can be designed to assist human activities in both normal situation and emergency evacuation.

Advisor: Yi Guo
yi.guo@stevens.edu
X 5658

7.EXPLORATION OF AN ACTIVE SURFACE USING SMART POLYMERS COATED ON HIGH-ASPECT-RATIO MICROSTRUCTURES

The objective of this research is to investigate a smart polymers coated on high-aspect-ratio microstructures to gain a systematic understanding of the 3 dimensional effects of micro and nanoscale features.The approach is to explore dynamic changes to the surface properties, which utilizes actively tuned micro and nanostructured smart polymer surfaces capable of reconfiguring their nanoscale topography as well as surface wettability. Polypyrrole (PPy) exhibits tunable surface energy, whereby the surface state can be switched entirely from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and vice versa. In this research, these PPy's unique properties will be utilized to enable reconfiguration of surface wettability, surface roughness and nanomechanical properties of nanosurfaces.

Advisor: EH Yang
eyang@stevens.edu
X 5574

8.CVD GROWTH AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 2 DIMENSIONAL VAN DER WAALS LAYERS

Graphene is poised to compete with current transparent conductive coatings widely used in electronic products such as touch screen displays, e-paper, and organic light-emitting diodes, requiring a low sheet resistance with high transmittance depending on the specific application. Initially motivated by work with graphene, the general class of 2D materials has generated enormous interest in the research community because of its potential for use in electronic devices and other applications. Non-graphene 2D atomic layers such as boron nitride and MoS2 have been integrated into devices. Those 2D materials could enable fine-tuning of device characteristics in combination with graphene since they are structurally related to graphene while having their own distinctive properties. High-quality 2D crystal growth has been demonstrated for both graphene and MoS2. In this project, the students will develop the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of a few 2D van der Waals materials and characterize the materials for device applications.

Advisor: EH Yang
eyang@stevens.edu
X 5574

9.STEREO VISION FOR DRIVER ASSISTANCE AND AUTONOMOUS NAVIGATION 

In parallel with Google driverless car project (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_driverless_car) most automobile manufacturers are engaged in research for lower cost solution to assist the driver by sensing the environment and providing real time feedback. Examples include obstacle avoidance, blind spot monitoring, lane departure warnings etc. A key technology for achieving these goals is stereo vision. Using input from two or more cameras the car computer can estimate distances and velocities with much higher accuracy than by using a single camera. Several projects are available in this area, see for example http://www.cvlibs.net/datasets/kitti/, for students with knowledge of C/C++ and geometry.

Advisor: Philippos Mordohai
Philippos.Mordohai@stevens.edu
X 5611

10.DEVELOPMENT OF NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL OF A MULTIDIMENSIONAL VIRTUAL HAND

The objective of this project is to design and test the control of a multidimensional virtual hand. Students engaged in this project will learn and develop: MATLAB SIMULINK, Virtual Reality, Control systems, Biomedical Signal Processing principles. The project is a collaborative research effort between Stevens Institute of Technology and the Jersey City Medical Center. Students will have hands on experience in learning and designing several biomedical engineering principles and contribute to this state-of-the-art research.

Advisor: Ramana Vinjamuri
ramana.vinjamuri@stevens.edu
X 3503

11.USING EEG SIGNALS TO DETERMINE INTENT. BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACE (BCI) PROJECT

This project will use a neural headset to try to determine the intent of a subject to carry out a standard movement of their right or left hand on a signal to do so. The movement of limbs is coordinated by the motor cortex and sent down the spinal cord to activate the appropriate muscles in a coordinated and efficient way. That electrical signal is transmitted from the motor cortex milliseconds before the mechanical action takes place and can be recorded by the electrodes in the neural headset. Interpretation of the intent can be used in BCI software and in designing lower limb prostheses using non-invasive EEG signals.

Requires familiarity with Matlab/Simulink software.
Advisor: Dr. Arthur B. Ritter
aritter@stevens.edu
X 8290

12.CAN A ROBOT CLIMB STAIRS AND OPEN DOORS WITHOUT FALLING ?

In a recent DARPA competition, 10 finalist Robots from various academic and industrial enterprises were put through an obstacle course that involved ordinary human functions such as climbing stairs and opening doors. Almost none of the Robots were able to climb stairs and many could not succeed in just opening a closed door. The objective of this project is to use the Motion Capture lab to record the motion of limbs and center of gravity of human volunteers as they climb a set of stairs. The velocities and accelerations of the limbs and center of gravity of the subjects will be calculated from the motion capture data. The data will then be imported to software (MIMICS) that allows 3-D calculations of forces on joints as the subjects climb the stairs. From these analyses, we hope to be able to design a prototype Robot that will be able to climb stairs in a similar manner to a human.

Advisor: Dr. Arthur B. Ritter
aritter@stevens.edu
X 8290

13.KINEMATIC MODELLING AND CLOSED-LOOP CONTROL OF A MULTIPLE DEGREE OF FREEDOM 3D-PRINTED PROSTHETIC ROBOT HAND USING VISION PROCESSING

This project aims to develop a control system for a low-cost five-finger prosthetic robot hand system. This will be done in two stages. First, the student will model the kinematic behavior of a consumer-grade 3D-printed robotic hand. Then, once modelling is completed, closed-loop control techniques will be developed and implemented to optimize the performance of the hand in carrying out fine motor skill manipulation within the environment (including operations like sorting objects, turning knobs, etc.).
At this stage, the focus will be on utilizing real-time image processing through MATLAB for sensing the hand's state within the environment and using an Arduino based hardware control platform for actuation. Other sensors and mechanisms may also be utilized, if deemed appropriate.

Suggested applicant skills:
Experience programming for computer simulation and embedded hardware environments
Experience with robotic and mechatronic systems
Knowledge of MATLAB and Arduino functionality
Basic image processing experience

Advisor: Prof. Mishah U. Salman
msalman@stevens.edu
X 5072

14.MITIGATION MEASURES OF SHOCKWAVES IN MATERIAL

The task is to explore mechanisms to mitigate nature-made (earthquake) or man-made (blast) shock waves in material and conduct feasibility studies. The task is structured in literature review, understanding the physics in transient dynamics and a computational study. Recent findings have shown that the pressure pulse-induced shock wave can be redirected, fully reflected or absorbed through impedance mismatch, momentum resistance or energy absorption, respectively. We will look into these phenomena, model them and explore innovative approaches to mitigate shock waves.

Qualifications: Interest in mechanics/physics

Advisor: Marcus Rutnerv
mrutner@stevens.edu
X 8711

15.CREATING A FAST RUNNING DESIGN TOOL FOR BLAST-RESISTANT DESIGN

Recent research results in blast-resistant design show that the blast response of a structural member can be very accurately approximated by a response surface. The task in this project is to take this new information and create a GUI (graphical user interface) using Matlab. Development of such a design tool is very valuable since the vulnerability assessment of blast-loaded structures is so far only possible using costly and time-consuming finite element analysis.

Qualifications: Knowledge in Matlab (GUI) would be beneficial

Advisor: Marcus Rutnerv
mrutner@stevens.edu
X 8711

16.IMPLEMENTATION OF MATLAB CODE TO ENABLE ARBITRARY FRACTURE ANALYSIS

The task is to code a Matlab code to access the input file of a finite element program and modify its structure to allow discrete fracture propagation in arbitrary direction, multi-crack development and crack branching during the finite element analysis run. No commercial finite element analysis code does have the capability yet to model discrete cracking of multi-cracks and crack branching, which is required to explore a variety of failure modes. The effort of this summer research is to implement a specific algorithm to enable discrete fracture analysis in arbitrary direction and multi-cracking which essentially enables more accurate computation of discrete cracking in materials.

Qualifications: Matlab experience would be very beneficial

Advisor: Marcus Rutnerv
mrutner@stevens.edu
X 8711

17.OIL-IMPREGNATED SUPER-SLIPPERY SURFACES

The objective of this project is to develop manufacturing processes and techniques for highly non-wetting super-slippery surfaces. Nature such as plants and insects uses micro- and nano-textured surfaces in their components (e.g., leaves, wings, eyes, and legs) for multi-purposes such as self-cleanness. Such multi-functional surface properties are attributed to the 3D surface structures. Especially, hydrophobic surface structures create a composite interface with liquid by retaining air or oily fluids between the structures, minimizing the contact area with an acqueous liquid. Such non-wetting surface property can offer numerous application potentials including anti-fogging, anti-snow adhesion, anti-frosting, anti-corrosion, low flow-friction, and anti-biofouling. In this project, we will develop novel fabrication and coating processes and techniques for the super-slippery surfaces of various types of substrate materials. The developed methods/materials will be applied for invention disclosure and used as preliminary results for grant proposals.

Advisor: Chang-Hwan Choi
cchoi@stevens.edu
X 5579

18.DROPLET AND BUBBLE DYNAMICS ON MICRO/NANO-PATTERNED SURFACES

The objective of this project is to investigate droplet and bubble dynamics on micro/nano-structured surfaces, including contact angles, rolling/sliding motions, pinning/depinning forces, etc, in order to understand how surface micro/nano-patterns affect the dynamic behaviors of droplets and bubbles. The experimental results will be used for conference presentation and also as preliminary results for grant proposals.   

Advisor: Chang-Hwan Choi
cchoi@stevens.edu
X 5579

19. SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR HETEROGENOUS APPLICATION

Many data-intensive and compute-intensive applications stand to gain by leveraging the accelerating power of diverse architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and FPGAs for various tasks within the application. The goal of this project is to develop a software framework that will seamlessly aid in collaboration between the architectures by transferring the data dependencies for the tasks. The tasks that are designed to run on both the GPU and FPGA will exchange dependencies via the underlying hardware interconnect resource (PCIe bus) that is capable of supporting high bandwidth (order of several hundred MB/s). Currently there exist no automatic framework that can aid application developers to take advantage of the resources. The prototype application we built, serves as a proof of concept and has the potential to transform into a software library that enables heterogeneous application development. The focus of the project will be development of a tool-chain that includes driver building, library bindings, language development for GPU+FPGA tasks that will act as the platform over which applications can be run.   

Advisor: Narayan Ganesan
narayan.ganesan@stevens.edu
X 8057

20. TEST BED DEVELOPMENT

Use GNU Radio software and USRP hardware modules to development a cognitive radio test bed. Implement and test cognitive radio algorithms for efficient and reliable wireless communications. C++ is used in software implementation.

This project is in support of the Stevens strategic themes: Software Engineering and Cyber Security and STEM. Specific outcomes required from this research are; prototype development, preparation of a white paper, and/or conference presentation.

Additional Information:
http://www.ettus.com
http://gnuradio.org

Advisor: Prof. Yu-Dong Yao
yyao@stevens.edu
X 5264

21. INTERACTIVE SIMULATION PLATFORM FOR COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS

Java/Java Scripts or Matlab to develop a simulation platform with interactive GUI to model and simulate cognitive radio networks for both military and civilian application scenarios. Issues related to wireless communications throughput, reliability, security, and energy efficiency will be investigated.

This project is in support of the Stevens strategic themes: Software Engineering and Cyber Security and STEM. Specific outcomes required from this research are; prototype development, preparation of a white paper, and/or conference presentation.

Additional Information:
http://personal.stevens.edu/~yyao/CR-simulation-pic.pdf

Advisor: Prof. Yu-Dong Yao
yyao@stevens.edu
X 5264

22. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF INTERFERENCE IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS

Use of calculus and probability theory in modeling and analyzing cognitive radio networks. Different interference and malicious attack scenarios will be examined. Algorithms to mitigate interference and counter malicious attacks will be developed.

This project is in support of the Stevens strategic themes: Software Engineering and Cyber Security and STEM. Specific outcomes required from this research are; prototype development, preparation of a white paper, and/or conference presentation.

Additional Information:
http://personal.stevens.edu/~yyao/paper-pdf/2012-hu-yao-mitola-tw-898.pdf
http://personal.stevens.edu/~yyao/paper-pdf/2011-chen-cheng-yao-tw-2135.pdf

Advisor: Prof. Yu-Dong Yao
yyao@stevens.edu
X 5264