Meet the Vice Provost: Christos Christodoulatos

Dr. Christos Christodoulatos was appointed Associate Provost to the Office for Academic Entrepreneurship in April of 2008. On September 2012 he was appointed as Vice-Provost of Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The OIE with the mandate to modernize the technology transfer process and implement educational and research programs that bring the concepts of innovation and entrepreneurship into the classroom and the research laboratory. Dr. Christodoulatos has been teaching and performing research in environmental science and engineering since 1988 and over the last ten years is leading the promotion and implementation of academic entrepreneurship across Stevens schools, research centers, departments and the technology transfer enterprise. Through NSF funding he worked collaboratively with various stakeholders to establish the Environmental Entrepreneurship Laboratory (E2-Lab) at Stevens whose goal is to evaluate new approaches that help accelerate commercialization of innovative environmental science and technology. His research activities have been centered around development of environmentally compatible technology and responsible natural resource management practices that support environmental sustainability. He is also leading research in academic entrepreneurship, its role in the modern university and roadblocks that impede the traditional university technology transfer process. Dr. Christodoulatos has managed and executed over a hundred major research projects and serves as a consultant to government and private organizations. He holds several patents in water and air treatment technology and has authored over one hundred and fifty articles in professional journals, conference proceedings, and handbooks. He has chaired a number of international conferences on environmental technology, and he is a member of several professional organizations and serves as a reviewer to several journals. His research has been heavily cited in the environmental science and technology literature and he has created intellectual property (IP) with significant value to Stevens IP Entrepreneurship portfolio.

As director of the Center for Environmental Systems (CES) Dr. Christodoulatos worked diligently to build state-of-the-art environmental engineering and science facilities where highly specialized and trained personnel work to find cost effective and scientifically sound solutions to relevant environmental problems facing our society. Under Dr. Christodoulatos' leadership the Center attracted significant funding and performed research and technology development of national importance for the DOD, DOE, NASA, other federal and state agencies and the industry. Dr. Christodoulatos have formed partnerships with several research centers and universities around the world in order to increase the research and innovation footprint of CES and enrich the cultural experiences of the students. The research conducted by CES faculty on the treatment and environmental fate of heavy metals, such as arsenic and tungsten, has received national attention and has in some cases influenced the policies and regulatory framework for these substances. The impact and these contributions have been recognized nationally as attested by various articles in newspapers and national news media in several occasions. The scholarly output in terms of publications, citations, patents, participation to conferences and workshops reached record numbers.

Recognizing the importance of innovation and entrepreneurship in academia hehas worked to eliminate the obstacles endemic to traditional university intellectual property exploitation processes and an opportunity to revolutionize technology transfer and commercialization in an academic setting. He is the cofounder of two successfully commercialized spin off companies that attracted substantial early stage investment and were acquired by major U.S. corporations. Dr. Christodoulatos emphasized the participation of undergraduate and graduate students in entrepreneurial activities and their exposure to intellectual property creation, protection and commercialization. He worked with various teams from the Schaefer School of Engineering and Science, and the Howe School to Technology management to develop courses and programs for the undergraduate and graduate curricula that are now available to the Stevens students.