Howe School Faculty at the 2013 Ewing Marion Kauffman’s Research Conference on High Growth Female & Male Entrepreneurs

8/13/2013

Professor Tonoyan presented a paper in London

Vartuhi Tonoyan, Assistant Professor at the Stevens Institute of Technology, and Research Fellow at the Department of SME Research and Entrepreneurship at the University of Mannheim in Germany, and Robert Strohmeyer, Senior Research Fellow at the Department of SME Research and Entrepreneurship at the University of Mannheim, Presented a Study on Gender, High-Skilled Entrepreneurship and Innovation at the 2013 Kauffman’s Research Conference on High Growth Women’s Entrepreneurship in London, UK. Contact her for more information - vtonoian@stevens.edu

 

THE IMPACT OF FOUNDERS’ CAREER HISTORIES, ACQUISITION OF JACK-OF-ALL-TRADES-SKILLS AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF INNOVATIONS IN START-UPS LED BY FEMALE AND MALE ENTREPRENEUR


Despite the importance of innovation for the creation of wealth, gendered studies of innovation, entrepreneurship and growth remain scarce (Alsos, Hytti, Ljunggren and Tillmar, 2012). The main objective of our study is to develop and empirically test a model of the causes of the gender-specific differences in innovativeness of high-potential companies. Our study is framed within the occupational segregation theory literature, a theory that has been extensively used for explaining different outcomes in the labor market, such as the female-male wage gap. Additionally, we draw on the jack-of-all-trades theory of entrepreneurship which has been recently developed by a Stanford economist, Edward Lazear (Lazear, 2005).  By utilizing and combining major insights from these two theories, we develop our own model which predicts effects of an individual’s career history, his or her acquisition of jack-of-all-trades skills as well as his or her professional educational background on later likelihoods of developing and introducing different types of innovations as an entrepreneur. We utilize unique data on highly-skilled female and male entrepreneurs which we collected in a primary survey in Germany in 2009. We estimate probit regressions for analyzing the determinants of innovations and employ the Fairlie’s extension of the Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition (Blinder, 1973, Oaxaca, 1973) to explain the extent to which gender differences in innovations can be decomposed into two parts, namely entrepreneurs’ individual characteristics and resources, and the rest.

 

About Kauffman’s Research Conference on High Growth Women’s Entrepreneurship

The Kauffman Foundation hosted an intimate academic conference which aimed at bringing together experts and scholars from across disciplines such as law, finance, economics, management, marketing and entrepreneurship to discuss current work on high-growth women's entrepreneurship. This one day conference, immediately following the “We Own It Summit”, provided a forum for discussion of current and emerging work. Contributions presented at the conference represented original and ambitious research.  

 

About the Kauffman Foundation

The Ewing Kauffman Foundation is often referred to as one of the largest foundations in the United States- or as the world's largest foundation devoted to entrepreneurship (see more at  http://www.kauffman.org/about-foundation/vision-mission-and-approach.aspx ).