ECE seminar series: Digital Multimedia Forensics and Anti-Forensics

Thursday, March 7, 2013 ( 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm )

Location: McLean Building, Room 510

Contact: 
Prof. Yingying Chen (yingying.chen@stevens.edu)

 

Digital Multimedia Forensics and Anti-Forensics

BY Dr. Matthew Stamm

University of Maryland in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

 

ABSTRACT

As the use of digital multimedia content such as images and video has increased, so have the means and the incentive to create digital forgeries. Presently, powerful editing software allows forgers to create perceptually convincing digital forgeries. In response to this, researchers have begun developing digital forensic techniques capable of identifying digital forgeries. These forensic techniques operate by detecting imperceptible traces, known as fingerprints, left by editing operations in digital multimedia content. Little consideration, however, has been given to anti-forensic operations that an intelligent forger can design to fool forensic algorithms.

In this talk, I will discuss my recent work examining multimedia forensics and security from a forger’s point of view. I will demonstrate that an intelligent forger can design anti-forensic operations capable of hiding editing fingerprints and fooling forensic techniques. Furthermore, I will show that anti-forensic operations can leave behind their own fingerprints, thus allowing an investigator to detect the use of anti-forensics. Using game theory, I will analyze the adversarial dynamics between a forger and forensic investigator, and show how to identify the set of actions that no party has an incentive to deviate from. Additionally, I will demonstrate that anti-forensics can be used for non-malicious purposes such as to protect against reverse engineering.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Matthew Stamm is a research associate at the University of Maryland in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests lie in information security and signal processing, with a particular focus in multimedia forensics. He completed his undergraduate and graduate studies in electrical engineering at the University of Maryland, where he received his B.S. in 2004, his M.S. in 2011, and his Ph.D. in August 2012. For his dissertation research, he was named the first place winner of the Dean's Doctoral Research Award from the A. James Clark School of Engineering. Additionally, while at the University of Maryland he was a recipient of a Distinguished Teaching Assistant Award, selected as one of the A. James Clark School of Engineering's 2010 Future Faculty Fellows, and was one of 40 graduate students at the University of Maryland to be awarded an Ann G. Wylie Dissertation Fellowship in 2011. Prior to beginning his graduate studies, Matthew worked as an engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab.