School of Systems and Enterprises

Mission & Objectives

Today's engineered systems are more complex than their predecessors, not only in the sophistication of elements from which they are constructed, but in the number and nature of the interconnections between those elements. System failures today, whether an automobile malfunction on a busy highway or the loss of a spacecraft on a distant planet, are much more likely to result from an unanticipated interaction between elements than from the failure of a single part. Software intensive systems represent a special challenge because of the myriad of possible logic paths that can be woven through their code. And as Moore's law continues to drive down the size of computers and drive up their speed and power, software that was once deeply embedded within physical components has begun to emerge, enabling collaboration between components that would have been unimaginable only a few years ago.

While the complexity of technical systems continues to grow, equally as exciting is the emergence of a new class of systems, one for which there is no central control. Perhaps most readily exemplified by the Internet, such systems are characterized by the autonomy enjoyed by their elements, each acting locally to achieve its individual purpose without benefit of centralized control. And yet, because the elements are richly interconnected, such systems are capable of self-organizing to produce emergent behavior for which they have not been specifically designed. We are only beginning to scratch the surface in exploring the possibilities represented by these decentralized systems, or perhaps more properly systems of systems. Understanding their behavior, and perhaps even more ambitious, how to create conditions that result in their producing favorable outcomes, will keep researchers and designers occupied for many years to come.

Enterprises represent a special case of systems, one with enormous economic importance. While not traditionally considered within the same domain as technical systems, enterprises are increasingly viewed as representatives of a broader class of human designed systems, of which technical systems are only one example. Even by its simplest definition, three or more people engaged in purposeful activity, an enterprise would certainly be recognized as a system by a traditional systems engineer. Even this simple enterprise comprises a set of elements (people) working together to achieve a common purpose. But today's global enterprises are far more complex than this simple definition implies. Enabled by a revolution in communications and information technologies, they may be among the most complex systems ever conceived of by humans. In a sense, treating them in the same class as technical systems represents a natural evolution, from enterprise systems as enabling technology, to enterprises as systems of cross-functional processes, to enterprises as systems in their own right. Certainly, as we look at extended enterprises whose elements may be independent firms, widely dispersed across the globe, each with its own motivation, expertise, culture and organization, yet collectively working together to produce a product or service valued by customers, the challenge of designing, managing, evaluating and optimizing these systems is the equal of any we can find.

It is in this context that Stevens created the School of Systems and Enterprises (SSE) with the mission to provide interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary education and research rooted in systems thinking. We focus on applying a "systems approach" to better understand the nature of problems and opportunities, and to conceive novel concepts and solutions that achieve breakthrough results across a wide range of domains, including defense, homeland security, cybersecurity, intelligence, nuclear weapons, communications, space, infrastructure, finance and business solutions. While maintaining an emphasis on technical systems, we pay particular attention to the interplay between these systems and the human enterprises that design and develop them, operate and use them, and sustain and maintain them.

Our research and education are grounded in a deep understanding of the state of practice in real-world applications and we are committed to transferring new knowledge that can be utilized by practitioners to enhance their effectiveness. As a school, we are committed to an educational and research philosophy that we refer to as the "Open Academic Model," through which we:

  • Develop meaningful alliances with academic partners to develop and leverage thought leadership and competencies in our instructional and research initiatives, leading to the greatest benefit to our students and our sponsors.
  • Blur the boundary between the academic setting and the industrial/ government reality in our instructional and research approach. This is achieved through:
    • Bringing a fresh perspective to industry and government in an executable form - a specific method, tool, heuristic, or template
    • Bringing the industry and government reality into academia in a researchable or usable form - a problem statement, a specific challenge, heuristics, or case studies.

We believe that these alliances are essential to developing relevant and connected programs for the Systems Engineering (SE), Software Engineering (SSW), Engineering Management (EM), Enterprise Systems (ES), and Financial Engineering (FE) disciplines within academia.


The SSE faculty is engaged in a variety of research efforts including:

  • Enterprise Architecting,
  • Enterprise Optimization,
  • Financial Services Analytics
  • Systemic Risk
  • Systems and Enterprise Management,
  • Systems Engineering, Architecting and Testing,
  • Software Engineering, and
  • System Security

The research mission of SSE is supported by: the Center for Complex Systems & Enterprises (CCSE), the Financial Systems Center (FSC), and the Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC).

CCSE focuses its research on four key domains- Healthcare Delivery, Financial Systems, Sustainable Energy, and National Security- from the lens of Complex Systems and Enterprises.

The FSC is a state-of-the-art financial research and teaching facility that supports programs at the undergraduate, master’s and doctoral levels. The FSC serves as a platform for financial systems research, and the development, testing and evaluation of software for financial domain. The Center was formed to apply systems thinking and related methods to analyze, understand, and characterize the behavior of the complex global financial system.

The mission of the SERC is to enhance and enable the DoD’s capability in Systems Engineering for the successful development, integration, testing and sustainability of complex defense systems, services and enterprises. The SERC currently consists of 20 collaborating institutions led by Stevens, including the University of Southern California, Georgia Tech, Purdue, and 16 other institutions. The SERC focuses research to address four key challenges to DoD and the intelligence community: (1) respond more quickly, flexibility, agilely; (2) acquire, operate, and evolve large complex systems that have distributed and diffuse governance, architecture, and mission; (3) increase the pool and capabilities of systems engineers, and instill systems engineering thinking and skills into all engineers; and (4) address security challenges in a systemic fashion rather than piecemeal. 

Undergraduate Program in Engineering Management

Director -- Dr. Kate Abel

Engineering Management is a rapidly expanding field that integrates engineering, technology, management, systems, and business. High-technology companies in the telecommunications, financial services, manufacturing, pharmaceutical, consulting, information technology and other industries utilize the concepts and tools of EM such as project management, quality management, engineering economics, modeling and simulation, systems engineering and integration, and statistical tools. These technology-based companies recruit EM graduates for their expertise in these tools and techniques and to fill a critical need of integrating engineering and business operations.

The EM program combines a strong engineering core with training in accounting, cost analysis, managerial economics, quality management, project management, production and technology management, systems engineering, and engineering design. The course selection offered by this major exemplifies the Stevens interdisciplinary approach to developing strong problem-solving skills. The program prepares students for careers that involve the complex interplay of technology, people, economics, information, and organizations. The program also provides the skills and knowledge needed to enable students to work effectively at the interface between engineering and management and to assume professional positions of increasing responsibility in management or as key systems integrators.

The mission of the Bachelor of Engineering in Engineering Management (BEEM) Program is to provide an education based on a strong engineering core, complemented by studies in business, technology, systems, and management, to prepare the graduate to work at the interface between technology/engineering and management, and to be able to assume positions of increasing technical and managerial responsibility. The objectives of the EM program can be summarized as follows:

  • EM graduates have a strong general engineering foundation and are able to use modern technological tools while working on complex multidisciplinary problems.
  • EM graduates will have assumed leadership positions in their chosen areas of work using knowledge gained from their engineering management education.
  • EM graduates effectively work in teams on projects to solve real world problems. This effort can involve information research, the use of project management tools and techniques, and the economic justification of the solution that is effectively communicated in a written or oral project report/business proposal that is presented to the client.
  • EM graduates possess the ethics, knowledge, skills, and attributes to define, design, develop, and manage resources, processes, and complex systems needed to work in a multidisciplinary team environment.
  • EM graduates apply the management tasks of organizing, staffing, planning, financing, and the human element and have the tools to continue sustained intellectual growth in the corporate or academic world.

The EM Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Click here for typical EM course sequence.

Areas of Concentration

Engineering Management students can select their concentration elective courses among two technical electives and three general electives in various ways. Some of the students may wish to cluster those electives in ways that would help them gain expertise in an area of specialization within Engineering Management. The following groupings are possible specialty (concentration) areas that students can select from within the EM program:

Systems Engineering Concentration
  • EM 451 Analysis of Networks and Strategies (Fall)
  • EM 357 Elements of Operations Research (Spring)
  • EM 585 Introduction to Systems Architecture and Design (Fall)
Financial Engineering Concentration
  • EM 357 Elements of Operations Research (Spring)
  • FE 530 Introduction to Financial Engineering (Fall)
  • FE 535 Introduction to Financial Risk Management (Spring)

Students who chose the Financial Engineering concentration should take E243 and EM 364 in place of EM 365.

Requirements for a Minor in Engineering Management

The following courses are required for a minor in EM:

EM 275 : Project Management

EM 224 : Informatics and Software Development

EM 301 : Accounting & Business Analysis

EM 360 : Total Quality Management

EM Minors typically take the following courses as part of the Engineering Curriculum:

Required Engineering Core

E 355 : Engineering Economics

E 243 : Probability and Statistics for Engineers

TG 421 : Entrepreneurial Analysis of Engineering Design

Required Humanities Core

BT 243 : Macroeconomics

BT 244 : Microeconomics

Students wishing to pursue and EM minor can use any three of the EM 224, 275, 301, or 360 courses to satisfy the requirements for the three general electives. Thus, an EM minor requires a two-course overload.

4 + 1 Program

The SSE offers a unique four plus one program designed for exceptional Stevens undergraduate engineering and science students who wish to jointly pursue either a Masters of Engineering in Engineering Management (MEEM) or a Masters of Engineering in Systems Engineering (MESE) concurrently with their undergraduate degree. Admission to the program is by application only and is based on a superior academic record, relevant industry experience as a coop or intern, and demonstrated systems perspective.

Systems Engineering Minor

The Systems Engineering Minor is open to engineering students enrolled in an engineering major other than Engineering Management. (Non-engineering majors are not eligible for the SE Minor.)

Entry to the minor is by application only. Students who wish to apply must do so in writing and must possess a cumulative GPA of at least 3.3 at the time of application and have had at least one coop assignment or one relevant summer internship approved by the SE Minor advisor. The minor requires six courses, two of which must be in addition to those required to complete a student's major degree program (i.e. the minor requires a two course overload.)

Required courses for the minor are as follows:

  • EM 275 Program Management
  • EM 385 Innovative System Design
  • EM 457 Elements of Operations Research
  • EM 585 Introduction to System Architecture and Design
  • HPL 455 Ethical Issues in Science and Technology (which may be taken as a humanities elective)
  • One approved course from the major department as specified below.

Students in the Systems Engineering Minor are also required to complete an interdisciplinary Senior Design Project, with their Minor Advisor serving as a co-advisor for the project.

Approved Courses from the Major Department for the SE Minor

(These courses may also satisfy requirements within the major department. Some may have prerequisites, which must be taken within the requirements for the major or as additional overload and do not satisfy any SE Minor requirements.

Electrical Engineering
  • EE 441 Introduction to Wireless Systems, or
  • EE 478 Control Systems

Computer Engineering

  • CPE 441 Introduction to Wireless Systems

Mechanical Engineering

  • ME 421 Energy Conversion Systems, or
  • ME 483 Control Systems

Environmental Engineering

  • EN 377 Environmental Systems

Biomedical Engineering
  • BME 504 Medical Instrumentation and Imaging

Chemical Engineering

  • CHE 462 Chemical Process Control

Civil Engineering

  • CE 410 Transportation Engineering Design

Naval Engineering

  • OE 524 Introduction to Ship Design and Ship Building

Graduate Programs

Overview

The School of Systems and Enterprises offers a wide range of four course Graduate Certificates, Master of Engineering degrees in Systems Engineering, Engineering Management and Space Systems Engineering, and Master of Science degrees in Financial Engineering, Software Engineering, Enterprise Systems, and Infrastructure Systems. Courses are offered through a wide variety of delivery modes that include the traditional 15-week face-to-face semester format, online distance learning format, and highly popular modular formats1. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in Systems Engineering, Engineering Management, and Enterprise Systems.

Graduate Admissions

Admission to the school's graduate programs generally requires an undergraduate degree in engineering or a related technical discipline with a "B" or better average from an accredited college or university. Outstanding applicants in other areas may be conditionally admitted subject to the satisfactory completion of several ramp courses or introductory courses within the specific program. Experienced applicants who do not meet the minimum academic requirements will be considered for admission based on their industry experience and evidence of their ability to succeed in a graduate program. Students applying to the MS in Enterprise Systems should have an undergraduate education or significant industry experience that has a significant quantitative component. The MS in Financial Engineering requires a strong mathematics background and programming skills. Specific requirements are determined on an individual basis depending upon the student's background and experience.

It is required that any applicants requesting research assistantship appointments and applicants to the Ph.D. program provide evidence of the ability to carry out independent research. Examples of such evidence include the master's degree thesis work and/or completed work-related projects. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted in support of the application. International students must demonstrate their proficiency in the English language prior to admission by scoring at least 550 (210 for computer based) on the TOEFL examination. Applications for admission from qualified students are accepted at any time. Each student should meet with his/her advisor to develop a study plan that matches the student's background, experience, and interests while satisfying the requirements for any of the school's programs. Additional information on the Ph.D.

Systems Engineering Graduate Program

Director -- Ralph Giffin (Acting)

The SSE Systems Engineering graduate program offers a multidisciplinary approach to engineering education by providing a blend of engineering, systems, and management subjects. Our graduates manage engineering and technology, are able to address systems integration, life cycle issues, and systems thinking at the system and enterprise levels, in a market where globalization, technology, quality, complexity, and productivity are the key business drivers.

The school is an internationally recognized leader in systems engineering education offering flexible delivery formats tailored to the working professional. The program offers for graduate and not-for-credit unique weeklong modular formats. The modular formats minimize time away from "home base" while the live and intensive courses, and associated group exercises, ensure development of team building skills, leadership development, and the real-time negotiation and tradeoffs that characterize reality. Students are given reading assignments prior to the instruction. Further, participants pursing a degree or graduate certificate have time subsequent to the instruction to complete homework assignments and projects. Homework assignments and projects are not required for those students taking classes for continuing education units (CEUs) credit.

Our Systems Engineering graduate programs include Graduate Certificates, Master's Degree, Ph.D. Degree, as well as several International Programs. Each student should communicate with his/her advisor to develop a study plan that matches the student's background, experience, and interests while satisfying the requirements for any of the programs.

______________________________________

1 While the weeklong format is the most popular modular format, the program also offers the ability to tailor the modular structure in a variety of options. Examples of such tailoring include, five concurrent Fridays, every other Friday for 10 weeks, etc.

Graduate Certificates

The SSE offers several four course, 12-credit Systems Engineering Graduate Certificate programs geared to practitioners and students who:

  • Are interested in improving their current skills and technical competencies,
  • Are considering new career paths within industry,
  • Have been out of school for some time, and want to resume their studies without committing to a full 30 credit Master's Degree program, or
  • Already hold an advanced degree, but wish to continue their studies in a new or related area.

Credits earned in a Graduate Certificate can be applied toward a Master's Degree. Most of these certificates are offered on-line via web-based instruction. Approved four-course sequences include:

Systems Engineering and Architecting

The topics covered and material presented in the Systems Engineering and Architecting (SEA) certificate provides an interdisciplinary approach based on an "entire view" of missions and operational environments and combines the capabilities of platforms, systems, operators, and support to fashion solutions that meet customer needs. Our competencies in the SEA are nationally recognized for our achievements in engineering education and the research philosophy rooted in effective partnerships with industry, instructors whose broad backgrounds provide a balanced blend of academic rigor with practical experience teach the program.

Required courses for this Certificate include:
  1. SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  2. SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
  3. EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  4. SYS 605 Systems Integration
Systems and Supportability Engineering

With an increasing percentage (often 65% or more) of the system life cycle cost (LCC) being allocated to operations and support, there is urgency about exploring "cause and effect" relationships between design decisions and their operational and support related impacts. System and product robustness and sustainability become key when systems are costed using a LCC approach. The notion of "open" system architectures becomes an imperative wit increasing use of commercial system elements and common platforms. This four-course cluster in Systems and Supportability Engineering presents innovative methods and practices to integrate system reliability, maintainability, and supportability considerations into the systems engineering process. On the other hand, methods to optimize necessary logistics resources and processes are critical and are also studied in this sequence of courses. Current business trends are discussed and assessed.

Required courses for this Certificate include:
  1. SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  2. SYS 640 System Supportability and Logistic
  3. SYS 645 Design for System Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability
  4. SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
Logistics and Supply Chain Analysis

The Logistics and Supply Chain Analysis certificate focuses on the theory and practice of designing and analyzing supply chains. It will provide quantitative tools to identify key drivers of supply chain performance such as inventory, transportation, information and facilities from a holistic perspective. This graduate certificate program has a "how-to" orientation and the understanding gained in the courses can be immediately applied to the solution of on-the-job problems.

Required courses for this Certificate include:
  1. SYS 640 System Supportability and Logistics
  2. EM 665 Integrated Supply Chain Management
  3. SYS 670 Forecasting and Demand Modeling Systems
  4. EM 605 Elements of Operations Research or SYS 611 Simulation and Modeling
Systems Lens for Technical Leaders

The Systems Lens for Technical Leaders certificate allows aspiring technical leaders to develop and refine their skills in analyzing complex technical problems, synthesizing holistic solutions and making sound judgments in the presence of high ambiguity, rapid change and challenging non-technical constraints. It provides a leadership perspective for senior design engineers, systems engineers and technologists who have demonstrated superior domain engineering or technology expertise, and who are likely to assume positions as Chief Engineers, Chief Architects, Engineering Directors and Technical Executives. Courses are taught in a highly interactive manner, using real world case studies and projects, and provide the perspectives of experienced technical leaders to reinforce and supplement formal course material. Prerequisite: Permission of the SSE Associate Dean for Academics.

  • Required courses for this Certificate include:
    1. LSYS 625 Deciding What to Build and Why: Fundamentals of Systems Engineering for Technical Leaders
    2. LSYS 650 Bringing Solutions to Life: System Architecture and Design for Technical Leaders
    3. LSYS 605 Ensuring Systems Work and Are Robust: Systems Integration and Test for Technical Leaders
    4. LSYS 750 Managing Evolution-Deciding What's Next: Advanced Systems Architecture for Technical Leaders

SET Certificates

SET Graduate Certificates are offered as part of a special program provided to a specific Government sponsor and are not offered outside of that program. There are currently four SET Certificates, as follows:

Systems Engineering Foundation

This certificate integrates topics in systems requirements, analysis, architecture, and cost analysis in order to provide a foundation in the fundamentals of systems engineering. These issues span the system lifecycle, and are encountered via both classroom instruction and hands-on assignments intended to accelerate the student experience in the field of systems engineering. The three certificate courses provide the solid body of knowledge required to develop sound solutions for systems, as well as to assess system architectures.

Required courses for this Certificate include:

  1. SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  2. SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
  3. EM 620 Engineering Cost Management

Modeling and Simulation

This certificate emphasizes the development of modeling and simulation concepts and analysis skills necessary to design, program, implement, and use computers to solve complex systems/products analysis problems. The key emphasis is on problem formulation, model building, data analysis, solution techniques, and evaluation of alternative designs/ processes in complex systems/products. Overview of modeling techniques and methods used in decision analysis, including Monte Carlo and discrete event simulation is presented. Students will also be introduced to system dynamics models of business policy analysis and forecasting of associated management problems of complex systems and enterprise. Students will get hands-on training in systems modeling and perform their own case studies of real system of technology and/or business development.

Prerequisite: Course in statistics

Required courses for this Certificate include:

  1. SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation
  2. SYS 660 Decision and Risk Analysis
  3. SYS 681 Dynamic Modeling of Systems and Enterprises

Software Engineering Fundamentals

This graduate certificate provides a broad base and understanding of software development products dynamics and lifecycles, with an in-depth study of software requirements engineering and the engineering and architecture of dependable and safe systems. It is highly suggested for systems engineers, program and project managers, and systems architects.

Required courses for this Certificate include:

  1. SSW 540 Fundamentals of Software Engineering
  2. SSW 564 Software Requirements Analysis and Engineering
  3. SSW 689 Engineering of Trusted Systems

Systems Security

The objective of the Systems Security Certificate is to equip technology professionals to design and architect secure systems as well as to identify, test, and assess security capability of systems built by others. Graduates will be able to map abstract security features to technology implementation alternatives. They will be able to complete both academic and work assignments that entail sound evaluation of security technology alternatives.

Required courses for this Certificate include:

  1. SES 602 Secure Systems Foundation
  2. SES 622 Fundamentals of Security Systems Engineering
  3. SES 623 Systems Security Architecture and Design

Other Graduate Certificates

Several additional certificates are offered in partnership with other SSE and Stevens programs. In addition, Sponsor-specific certificates are also offered. For more information on these certificates please contact the Systems Engineering Program Director.

Master's in Systems Engineering

The SSE offers the Master of Engineering degree in Systems Engineering (MESE) through a wide variety of delivery modes to include traditional 15-week face-to-face semester formal, web-based distance format, and modular formats.

An undergraduate degree in engineering or related disciplines with a "B" average or better from an accredited college or university is generally required for graduate study in our ME and MS programs. Outstanding applicants in other areas may be conditionally admitted subject to the satisfactory completion of several ramp courses or introductory courses within the specific program. The specific requirements will be determined on an individual basis depending upon the student's background.

The MESE degree is a multidisciplinary program that includes a blend of engineering, systems thinking, and management subjects. Graduates from this program will be prepared to work effectively at the interface between engineering and management and to assume professional positions of increasing responsibility. The program consists of ten courses (five core and five advisor directed electives) for a total of 30 credit hours of course work.

The core courses are:

  • SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
  • EM 612 Project Management for Complex Systems
  • SYS 605 Systems Integration
  • SYS 800 Special Problems in Systems Engineering

One of the five faculty advisor directed electives must be in a quantitative course to include SYS 611, SYS 645, SYS 660, SYS 681, SYS 670, or other as approved by your advisor. With the approval of their faculty advisor, Students can pursue the thesis option which will take 6 credit hours of SYS 900 in place of SYS 800 and one SYS elective. 

Doctoral Program in Systems Engineering

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in Systems Engineering. The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is designed to develop your ability to perform research or high-level design in Systems Engineering.

Admission to the doctoral program is made through the school's PhD Admissions Committee, as described in section 3.A above.

International Programs

Nanyang Technological University (NTU)

The SSE in partnership with the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore, offers a dual degree program leading to Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering (through Stevens) and a Master of Science in Systems and Project Management (through NTU). The program mission is to prepare graduates in the twin competencies of systems engineering and project management, both sharing a common complex systems thinking and perspective.  This dual degree program aims to broaden the participants' educational experience and prepare them for a successful career in leadership positions in delivering systems-based products, services and solutions to the industries, businesses and government especially with countries in or have interest in developing businesses in Southeast Asia, India, and China.
The program is designed to be a resident program with students spending a minimum of one semester at the non-host university. To meet the degree requirements, candidates must earn 30 course credits by taking five courses from Stevens and four courses from NTU, plus an independent study project. Students should take the following courses from the SSE:

  • SYS625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS650 System Architecture and Design
  • SYS605 Systems Integration
  • EM612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  • SYS660 Decision and Risk Analysis or EM680 Designing and Managing the Development Enterprise

While studying at NTU, candidates must select four of the following System and Project
Management (SPM) courses:

  • SPM21/M6141 Quality Engineering
  • SPM22/M6205 Systems Simulation & Modeling
  • SPM23/M6601 Human Factors Engineering
  • SPM25/M6925 Enterprise IT/IS Project Management
  • SPM26/L6103 Supply Chain: Strategy and Design
  • SPM29/M6929 Management of Complex Engineering Projects
  • SPM30/M6426 Management of Technology and Innovation
  • SPM31/M6930 Project Estimation and Cost Management

All students in the program are required to take M6588 Independent Study from NTU producing a three credit hour capstone project. Note that students wishing to pursue a graduate certificate in Systems Engineering Management through Stevens are required to take EM 680 and SPM22.
Applicants should apply to their perspective host university. Cohorts are accepted for both the fall and spring terms.

Buskerud University College (BUC)

The SSE in partnership with the Department of Technology at Buskerud University College (BUC) in Kongsberg, Norway, offers a dual degree program leading to Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering from Stevens and a Master Degree in Systems Engineering from BUC.  The dual degree program aims to broaden the participants' educational experience and prepare them for a successful career in leadership positions delivering systems-based products, services and solutions to industries, businesses and government, especially with countries in or who have interest in developing businesses in Scandinavia and Northern Europe.  Students should apply to their perspective host universities. The program is designed to be a resident program with students spending a minimum of one semester at the non-host university. To meet the degree requirements, candidates must earn 30 course credits by taking five courses from Stevens and four courses plus a Master Project from BUC.

National University of Malaysia (UKM)

SSE, in partnership with the National University of Malaysia (UKM), offers a dual degree program leading to Master of Engineering (ME) in Systems Engineering or Engineering Management from Stevens and a Master of Science (MSc) in Industrial and Technology Management from UKM.  For candidates to gain this dual Masters degree they must fulfill a minimum of 33 credits by:
1. Completing 3 core courses at UKM and 2 technical elective, and
2. Completing 4 core courses in Systems Engineering at SIT and 1 technical elective, and
3. Completing 1 project-based UKM independent study. 
Applicants should apply to their perspective host university.

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

ITESM - Campus Guadalajara - is a research-intensive university with the mission to form persons with integrity, ethical standards and a humanistic outlook, who are internationally competitive in their professional fields; at the same time, they will be good citizens committed to the economic, political, social and cultural development of their community and to the sustainable use of natural resources. ITESM Campus Guadalajara has more than 7,600 High School, Undergraduate and Graduate Students.

Stevens and ITESM, in recognition of the value of international cooperation and student mobility, and as a supplement to any exchange agreement, have agreed to conjointly offer encompassing Dual Degree Programs involving:

  1. Master of Engineering in Systems Engineering (MSE) at SIT and Master in Science in Quality Systems and Productivity (MCP) at ITESM.

Candidates take the following four Stevens Institute of Technology Systems Engineering courses:

  • SYS 625          Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS 605          Systems Integration
  • SYS 650          System Architecture and Design
  • EM 612           Project Management of Complex Systems

And two additional courses from either:

  • SYS 645          Design for Reliability, Maintainability & Supportability
  • EM 680           Designing and Managing the Development System
  • SYS 640          System Supportability and Logistics

ITESM Masters in Quality Systems and Productivity candidates take the following courses:

  • GI5000           Research and Innovation Methods                
  • GI4000           Leadership for Business Innovation (1.5)

And four out of the five following courses

  • IN4019           Quality Management and Competitiveness
  • MA4009         Statistical Methods
  • IN4016           Optimization Methods for Decision  Making
  • IN4017           Production Engineering
  • IN4018           Supply Chain Management
  • GI5007           Thesis Project 1*
  • GI5008           Thesis Project 2*

*Students develop a Thesis/Project under guidance of ITESM-SIT Faculty

  1. Master of Science in Financial Engineering (MFE) at SIT and Master in Finance (MAF) at ITESM, Master in International Business (MIB) at ITESM or Master in Business Administration (MBA) at ITESM

Candidates take the following Stevens Institute of Technology Financial Engineering courses:

  • FE 610           Stochastic Calculus for Financial Engineers
  • FE 620           Pricing and Hedging
  • FE 621           Computational Methods in Finance

And three out of the following electives:

  • FE 630           Portfolio Theory and Applications
  • FE 680           Advance Derivatives
  • FE 635           Financial Enterprise Risk Engineering
  • FE 655           Systemic Risk and Financial Regulation

ITESM Masters in International Business candidates take the following International Business courses:

  • GA 4044        Introduction to Economics
  • GA 4075        Managerial Accounting
  • GA 4076        Financial Accounting
  • GA 4081        Fundamentals of Finance
  • GA 4043        Interpersonal Skills for International Management
  • GA4048         Consulting Project I
  • GA 4053        Leadership for Sustainable Development
  • GA 4083        Introduction to Latin American Management
  • GA4084         Quantitative Methods
  • GA 4040        Marketing
  • GA 4045        NAFTA Business Environment
  • GA4042         Elective I
  • GA4047         Elective II

ITESM Master in Finance candidates take the following courses:
One course of the following ITESM courses:

  • AD4003         Business Policy, Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility
  • DS4002          Leadership for Sustainable Development

And 7 of the following ITESM courses:

  • FZ5004          Finance Project
  • S 4009           Financial Econometrics
  • FZ4005          Financial Economics
  • FZ4006          Introduction to Corporate Finance
  • ZF4008          Investments
  • FZ5000          International Financial Management
  • FZ4007          Advanced Corporate Finance
  • FZ5003          Capstone Seminar in Finance

ITESM Masters in Business Administration candidates take the following courses:
One course of the following ITESM courses:

  • AD4003          Business Policy, Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility
  • DS4002          Leadership for Sustainable Development

And 7 of the following ITESM courses:

  • EC4005          Managerial Economics
  • CD4000         Operations Management
  • MT4001         Marketing Management
  • RH4000         Leadership and Organizational Behavior
  • AD4004         Competitive Strategy and Business Design
  • AD4005         Entrepreneurship and Intrapreneurship
  • AD5000         Negotiations and Decisions in Multicultural Environments
  • AD5001         Seminar in Transnational Management and Corporate Strategy
  1. Master of Engineering in Engineering Management (MEM) and Master in International Business (MIB) at ITESM or Master in Business Administration (MBA) at ITESM

Candidates take the following Stevens Institute of Technology courses:

  • EM 600          Engineering Economics & Cost Analysis
  • SYS 611         Modeling and Simulation
  • EM 612          Project Management of Complex Systems
  • SYS 625         Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • EM 680          Designing and Managing the Development System
  • SYS 605         Systems Integration

ITESM Masters in International Business candidates take the following International Business courses:

  • GA 4044         Introduction to Economics
  • GA 4075         Managerial Accounting
  • GA 4076         Financial Accounting
  • GA 4081         Fundamentals of Finance
  • GA 4043         Interpersonal Skills for International Management
  • GA4048          Consulting Project I
  • GA 4053         Leadership for Sustainable Development
  • GA 4083         Introduction to Latin American Management
  • GA4084          Quantitative Methods
  • GA 4040         Marketing
  • GA 4045         NAFTA Business Environment
  • GA4042          Elective I
  • GA4047          Elective II

ITESM Masters in Business Administration candidates take the following courses:
One course of the following ITESM courses:

  • AD4003          Business Policy, Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility
  • DS4002           Leadership for Sustainable Development

And 7 of the following ITESM courses:

  • EC4005           Managerial Economics
  • CD4000          Operations Management
  • MT4001          Marketing Management
  • RH4000          Leadership and Organizational Behavior
  • AD4004          Competitive Strategy and Business Design
  • AD4005          Entrepreneurship and Intrapreneurship
  • AD5000          Negotiations and Decisions in Multicultural Environments
  • AD5001          Seminar in Transnational Management and Corporate Strategy

Applicants should apply to their perspective host university. Cohorts are accepted for both the fall and spring terms. 

Engineering Management Graduate Program

Director -- Dr. Jose Ramirez-Marquez

Many engineers find themselves at a decision point about five years after graduation, when they must choose either to continue with their technical specialty or to enter the ranks of technical management. Those who choose the latter often find themselves inadequately prepared for their new responsibilities, having little experience or training in management, accounting, business strategy team development and other vital management skills. Engineering Management fills these gaps in engineering and science education with studies in business, management and systems engineering by affording the traditional engineer with formal education in the human, financial, and management skills necessary to develop high quality, cost efficient, technically complex systems and products.

Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificates offered by the Engineering Management Program are designed for program managers, project managers, and lead systems engineers involved with conceiving, defining, architecting, integrating and testing complex and multi-functional systems. Particular emphasis is placed on the modern engineering enterprise characterized by geographically dispersed and multi-cultural organizations. Accordingly, the role of e-collaboration is also examined, and the traditional project and program management concepts are re-examined in this context. The participating students are also introduced to the concept of the "extended" enterprise and the delivery of a value chain solution. Relevant subjects such as leadership, subcontracting, and partnering are also reviewed. Additionally, the human, financial, organizational, and systems integration skills necessary to make project teams more productive are addressed in these graduate certificate offerings.

Engineering Management

  • EM 600 Engineering Economics and Cost Analysis
  • EM 605 Elements of Operations Research
  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  • EM 680 Designing and Managing the Development Enterprise

Systems Engineering Management

  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  • SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS 660 Decision and Risk Analysis
  • EM 680 Designing and Managing the Development Enterprise

Data Exloration and Vizualization for Risk and Decision Making 

  • EM 622 Data Analysis and Visualization Techniques for Decision making
  • EM 623 Data Science and Knowledge Discovery in Engineering Management
  • EM 624 Informatics for EM
  • SYS 660 Decision and Risk Analysis
 
Master's Degree in Engineering Management

The Master's of Engineering in Engineering Management builds upon undergraduate engineering and science education with studies in business, management, and systems engineering. Graduates of this program are prepared to work effectively at the interface between engineering and management and to assume professional positions of increasing responsibility. The six core courses for the program are:

  • EM 600 Engineering Economics and Cost Analysis
  • EM 605 Elements of Operations Research
  • SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation or SYS 681 Dynamic Modeling of Systems and Enterprise
  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems or EM 680 Designing and Managing the Development System
  • EM 624 informatics

Students lacking a strong quantitative background that includes an introduction to calculus and statistics may be required to take several ramp courses as defined by the admission conditions listed into the acceptance letter.

Students are encouraged to take an integrated four-course sequence leading to a graduate certificate for the four advisor approved electives or four additional courses in SE, EM, or ES. Most of these certificates are offered on-line via web-based instruction. Approved four-course sequences include:

  • Construction Management,
  • Data Exploration and Vizualization for Risk and Desicion Making
  • Enterprise Architecture and Governance,
  • Financial Engineering,
  • Infrastructure Management,
  • Logistics and Supply Chain Analysis
  • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Practices,
  • Project Management,
  • Software Engineering,
  • Space Systems Engineering,
  • Systems-Centric Software Engineering,
  • Systems Engineering and Architecting,
  • Systems Engineering Management,
  • Systems and Supportability Engineering, or
  • Systems Engineering Security.

A faculty advisor must approve other options. Note that all of these certificates are available to undergraduate students as part of the four plus one program.

An undergraduate degree in engineering or related disciplines with a "B" average or better from an accredited college or university is generally required for graduate study in our ME and MS programs. Outstanding applicants in other areas may be conditionally admitted subject to the satisfactory completion of several ramp courses or introductory courses within the specific program. The specific requirements will be determined on an individual basis depending upon the student's background.

It is required that any applicants requesting research assistantship appointments and applicants to the Ph.D. program provide evidence of the ability to carry out independent research. Examples of such evidence include the master's degree thesis work and/or completed work-related projects. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted in support of the application. International students must demonstrate their proficiency in the English language prior to admission by scoring at least 550 (210 for computer based) on the TOEFL examination. Applications for admission from qualified students are accepted at any time. Each student should meet with his/her advisor to develop a study plan that matches the student's background, experience, and interests while satisfying the requirements for any of the school's programs.

3 Recommended for students who have an undergraduate class in engineering economics.

Doctoral Program in Engineering Management

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered in Engineering Management. The program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is designed to develop your ability to perform research or high-level design in Engineering Management.

Admission to the doctoral program is made through the school's PhD Admissions Committee, as described under graduate programs above.

Space Systems Engineering Graduate Program

Director -- Dr. Pete McQuade

Astronomical! That might be the right word for the challenges and opportunities facing today's space programs. From the retirement of the Space Shuttle to the emergence of commercial resupply for the International Space Station; from the cancellation of NASA's Constellation program to the spectacular, game-changing discoveries emerging from Spirit and Opportunity, Kepler, LCROSS, and other unmanned missions; from the emergence of China and India as major space nations, to the rapid proliferation of space products and services into everyday life. Fundamental changes are afoot in the world of space.

To succeed in that world, you need robust technical knowledge of space missions and systems, as well as the systems-engineering skills and tools to master the complexities of ever-more demanding missions, budgets, and policies. The Stevens Institute's Master of Engineering degree and Graduate Certificate in Space Systems Engineering (SpSE) provide those critical capabilities to professionals working in government and private space enterprises. Our faculty cadre of respected space and systems engineering professionals stand ready to team with you and help you excel, as you tackle those challenges of space in the 21st Century.

Graduate Certificate

The certificate in Space Systems Engineering integrates crucial activities spanning the entire system life cycle. Information and capabilities are learned by participants in hands-on space system and mission design assignments focusing on: operations, concept development, space system architecture, verification and validation, as well as key system engineering processes and tools. These four courses provide the backbone for the development of space systems engineers. This certificate is relevant for professionals who wish to complement their existing knowledge and skills base to include state of the art spacecraft and mission analysis design combined with an holistic systems engineering and architecture perspective.

  • SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
  • SYS 632 Designing Space Missions and Systems OR SYS 635 Human Spaceflight
  • SYS 633 Mission and Systems Design Verification and Validation (V&V); for students taking the Graduate Certificate online, substitute SYS 605 Systems Integration

Master's Degree in Space Systems Engineering

The master's program consists of 10 courses for a total of 30 credits. Students wishing to enroll in the Space Systems Engineering program must have an undergraduate degree in an engineering or science discipline. Students take five core classes, and then either four electives and a capstone project class (SYS 800) or three electives and a thesis (SYS 900).

  • SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Engineering
  • SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
  • SYS 632 Designing Space Missions and Systems 
  • SYS 633 Mission and Systems Design Verification and Validation (V&V); for students taking the Master's Degree online, substitute SYS 605 Systems Integration
  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems

Students must take two Space Concentration electives and two Systems Concentration electives, from the lists below.  (If the student will be taking a thesis, SYS 900, one elective may be omitted, upon advisor approval.)

Space Concentration Electives

  • SYS 635 Human Spaceflight
  • SYS 636 Space Launch and Transportation Systems
  • SYS 637 Cost-Effective Space Mission Operations
  • SYS 638 Crew Exploration Vehicle Design Exercise

Systems Concentration Electives

  • SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation
  • SYS 645 Design for System Reliability, Maintainability, and Supportability
  • SYS 660 Decision and Risk Analysis

Students have the option of working on either a project or a thesis. The project and thesis credit classes are

  • SYS 800 Special Problems in Systems Engineering (3 credit hours)
  • SYS 900 Thesis in Systems Engineering (6 credit hours)

A student pursuing the SYS 900 thesis may omit one elective class, with approval of their advisor.

Software Engineering Graduate Program

Director -- Linda Laird

Today, businesses, government, consumers and infrastructure all rely on their software systems. There is increasing recognition that vulnerabilities in software can jeopardize intellectual property, consumer trust and business operate.

Graduate Certificates

Students may enroll in the program to pursue a degree and/or a certificate. Approved four-course Certificates in Software Engineering include:

  1. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING. Creating successful systems is more than just writing software. This introductory certificate gives you a strong foundation in the fundamentals of software engineering - the engineering that is required to create software systems that work. Required courses for this Certificate include:
    1. SSW 540 Fundamentals of Quantitative Software Engineering
    2. SSW 533 Software Estimation and Measurement
    3. Choose two additional Software Engineering courses (SSW Prefix) or two from the list below to complete the Certificate program:
      • CS501 Introduction to Java Programming
      • CS546 Web Programming
      • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  2. SOFTWARE SYSTEMS ARCHITECT. Software systems architecture is one of the most important activities in any system development project. Systems succeed or fail because of their architecture. This Graduate Certificate is an intensive, in-depth study of the best practices of software systems architecture and design. Required courses for this Certificate are:
    1. SSW 540 Fundamentals of Software Engineering
    2. SYS 650 System Architecture and Design
    3. SSW 565 Software Architecture and Component-Based Design
    4. SYS 750 Advanced System & Software Architecture
  3. Software Acquisition and Integration. The courses in this certificate provide students with the skills and knowledge needed to participate in and lead complex software-enabled system development and acquisition programs and include:
    1. SSW 540 Fundamentals of Quantitative Software Engineering
    2. SSW 564 Software Requirements Analysis and Engineering
    3. SSW 687 Acquisition and Management of Large Software Systems
    4. SYS 605 Systems Integration
  4. Acquisition and Management of Trusted Software Systems. This graduate certificate covers those topics and skills needed by managers to successfully deploy trustworthy systems. It prepares graduates to identify and prevent security vulnerabilities in modern software systems, and it is part of the program on Software Assurance offered at Stevens Institute of Technology. Required courses are:
    1. SES 602 Secure Systems Foundations
    2. SSW 533 Software Estimation and Measurement
    3. SSW 564 Software Requirements Analysis and Engineering
    4. SSW 687 Acquisition and Management of Large Software Systems
  5. Development of Trusted Software Systems. This graduate certificate provides the knowledge and skills needed by experienced software engineers to develop trustworthy systems. It prepares graduates to develop software systems that function correctly and are free of security vulnerabilities, and it is part of the program on Software Assurance offered at Stevens Institute of Technology. Required courses are:
    1. SSW 556 Software Development for Trusted Systems
    2. SSW 689 Engineering of Trusted Software Systems
    3. SES 602 Secure Systems Foundations
    4. SES 603 Secure Systems Laboratory

All of these certificates also are available to graduate students who are pursuing a Master's degree and those graduate students who want to update and/or extend their software engineering education without pursuing a degree. The latter two certificates are part of the program on Software Assurance. Undergraduate students may earn any of these certificates as part of the four plus one program.

Master of Science in Software Engineering

The Master of Science degree in Software Engineering is a 10-course program emphasizing the understanding of software engineering principles and quantitative measurement. At Stevens, these are seen as critical to the successful management and completion of all software programs, including development, integration and acquisition programs, both complex and simple. Success in such software programs occurs only when the end systems produced perform correctly, reliably, securely and safely throughout their intended life.

Stevens follows the curriculum guidelines and recommendations of the GswE2009 graduate software engineering curriculum report (http://www.gswe2009.org/), jointly sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and IEEE Computer Society. The Masters degree is awarded subsequent to the successful completion of ten courses--six core courses required of all degree candidates plus four advisor-directed electives. The core courses are:

  • SSW 540 Introduction to Quantitative Software Engineering
  • SSW 533 Software Estimation and Measurement
  • SSW 564 Software Requirements Analysis and Engineering
  • SSW 565 Software Architecture and Component-Based Design
  • SSW 567 Software Testing, Quality Assurance and Maintenance
  • SSW 800 Master's Project

The four additional advisor-approved courses normally will be taken in Software Engineering, Engineering Management, Computer Science, Financial Engineering, Systems Engineering or Enterprise Systems. Students are encouraged to use their advisor-approved elective courses to achieve one or more of the integrated four-course sequences leading to a graduate certificate (see above for a list of SSW graduate certificates).

In addition, Stevens offers a Master of Science in Software Engineering with a Concentration in Software Assurance. The concentration in Software Assurance prepares graduates to play a leading role in developing, maintaining, acquiring and operating software systems that must meet strict software assurance requirements.

To receive the Master of Science in Software Engineering with a Concentration in Software Assurance, a student fulfils all of the requirements for the Master of Science in Software Engineering and takes the following courses in lieu of electives:

  • SSW 689 Engineering of Trusted Software Systems
  • SES 602 Secure Systems Foundations
  • SES 603 Secure Systems Laboratory
  • And either
    • SSW 556 Software Development for Trusted Systems,
    • or SSW 687 Acquisition and Management of Large Software Systems

Financial Engineering Graduate Program

Director -- Dr. Khaldoun Khashanah

The vast complexity of financial markets compels industry to look for experts who not only understand how they work, but also posses the mathematical knowledge to uncover their patterns and the computer skills to exploit them. To achieve success, banking and securities industries must come to grips with securities valuation, risk management, portfolio structuring, and regulation-knowledge embracing applied mathematics, computational techniques, statistical analysis, and economic theory. The goal of the degree is to produce graduate who can make pricing, hedging, trading, and portfolio-management decisions in the financial services enterprise. With sharply honed practical skills complimented by strong technical elements, graduates are in demand in the industries-investment banking, risk management, securities trading and portfolio management. Students wishing to enroll in any of the FE programs must have an undergraduate degree in an engineering or science discipline and strong quantitative background with exposure to the following subjects

  • Calculus and Differential Equations,
  • Probability and Statistics,
  • Linear Algebra, and
  • Programming Languages C++ or Java and Spreadsheets.

The FE program offers Graduate Certificates, Masters in FE, and PhD in FE. The PhD program in FE started in 2009 and is the first in the nation.

Graduate Certificates

The Graduate Certificate program consists of 4 courses for a total of 12 credits. There are four Graduate Certificate from which to choose.

1) Financial Engineering

This four-course graduate certificate in Financial Engineering is an online, instructor-led, program that provides you with what you need to know in stochastic modeling, optimization, and simulation techniques. The components of financial problem solving are embedded in the methods of applied mathematics, computational techniques, statistical analysis and economic theory. In a Financial Engineering program, those components are directed towards solving problems in securities valuation, risk management, portfolio structuring and regulatory concerns with emphasis on tools and training in stochastic modeling, optimization, and simulation techniques. Financial markets can be viewed as complex systems whose design, implementation, verifiability, reliability and accuracy rely heavily on the spanning communication networks and each node in the system. This in effect lays the burden on the trustworthiness of software and its ability to mirror and propel the growing demand for dealing with ever emerging financial systems complexities. Financial Systems resilience, reliability and agility are a function of the software engineering characteristics underlying their operations. In financial systems, two broad areas of software applications can be distinguished: the first we will call inter-system infrastructural software (ISIS) and the second is intra-system super structural software (ISSS) with middleware at the interfaces along with well- defined protocols. To support work force development and research in the ISIS and ISSS arenas, the SSE offers certificates in Software Engineering in Finance and Financial Software Engineering, respectively. Required courses for this certificate include:

  • FE 610 Stochastic Calculus for Financial Engineers
  • FE 620 Pricing and Hedging
  • FE 621 Computational Methods in Finance
  • FE 630 Portfolio Theory and Applications

2) Financial Risk Engineering

This certificate is designed to equip the graduate with solid understanding of the issues surrounding financial risk in both theoretical and practical aspects. The recent turbulence in the financial system heightened the need for a much stronger under- standing of the financial system, its environment and the risk measures applied in the industry to quantify risk it in its multiple hierarchies. This certificate enables the graduate to fill this need and play an important role in balancing the interests of shareholders with the appropriate levels of risk taken by the managers and decision makers. Required courses for this Certificate include:

  • FE 535 Introduction to Risk Management
  • FE 610 Stochastic Calculus for Financial Engineers
  • FE 635 Financial Enterprise Risk Engineering
  • FE 655 Systemic Risk and Financial Regulation

3) Financial Software Engineering

The Financial Software Engineering graduate certificate is aimed at intra-system super structural software applications. Placing an order with a respective broker triggers a sequence of events that starts localized in nature and particular to the brokering firm and its software; hence, this is an example of an intra-system super structural software (ISSS) application wherein the system is the firm itself. Retail software platforms, Web trading desks, pricing software tools for new instruments including derivatives products and stochastic portfolio simulators, and cutting edge information and knowledge discovery tools in a firm are all examples of software engineering in financial institutions. Required courses for this Certificate include:

  • SSW 540 Fundamentals of Software Engineering
  • SSW565 Software Architecture and Component-based Design
  • FE 610 Stochastic Calculus for Financial Engineers
  • FE 620 Pricing and Hedging

4) Software Engineering in Finance

Clearing systems, payment systems and settlement systems are all examples of inter-system infrastructural software (ISIS). For example the Clearing House Interbank Payments System (CHIPS) is a patented algorithm for payment netting whose participants must have an account with the New York Federal Reserve Bank. The FedWire, SWIFT and SunGard are at the core of ISIS where the "Buy" side of the market meets the "Sell" side of the market through intermediaries and Banks with clearinghouses and custodians. The Graduate Certificate in Software Engineering in Finance explores this class of problems dealing with inter-financial systems information flows. Required courses for this Certificate include:

  • SSW 540 Fundamentals of Software Engineering
  • SSW565 Software Architecture and Component-based Design
  • FE 595 Financial Systems Technology
  • MGT 623 Financial Management or
  • MGT 638 Corporate Finance

Master's Degree in Financial Engineering

The MS in FE services the financial services industries. This industry has an increasing need for graduates who are trained in the mathematical methods that are now used to solve problems in finance. In our financial engineering program, you learn how to use relevant techniques from applied mathematics, statistics, and economics develop, analyze, and implement financial products involving securities valuation, risk management, portfolio structuring, and regulatory concerns. Training in quantitative analysis, modeling, optimization, simulation techniques, and technology interface is emphasized. Financial Engineering serves the financial services industries that are home to some of the most complex systems and enterprises in our society.

The master's of science program in Financial Engineering consists of 10 courses for a total of 30 credits. Students wishing to enroll in any of the FE programs must have an undergraduate degree in an engineering or science discipline.

The program consists of ten courses (six core and four advisor-directed electives) and includes:

  • FE 610 Stochastic Calculus for Financial Engineers,
  • FE 620 Pricing and Hedging,
  • FE 621 Computational Finance,
  • FE 630 Portfolio Theory and Applications,
  • FE 680 Advanced Derivatives, and
  • FE 800 Special Problems in Financial Engineering.

Students are encouraged to take an integrated four-course sequence leading to a graduate certificate for the four advisor-approved electives or four additional advisor approved courses. Most of these certificates are offered on-line via web-based instruction. Approved four-course sequences leading to an existing graduate certificate include:

Management Focused

  • Database Systems,
  • Engineering Management,
  • Systems Engineering and Architecting, and
  • Information Management

Quantitative Focused

  • Risk Engineering
  • Applied Statistics and
  • Stochastic Systems

Software Focused

  • Software Engineering,
  • Software Engineering in Finance, and
  • Financial Software Engineering

Research/Thesis Option

  • FE 900 Thesis in Financial Engineering (6 credits) and two advisor approved electives or
  • FE 800 Special Problems in Financial Engineering (3 credits) and three advisor approved electives

Courses FE 530, FE 535, FE 540, FE 595, FE 635 and FE 655 or any other 600 level FE course may count towards the Master's degree without being part of a focus or a certificate.

Doctoral Program in Financial Engineering

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in FE was introduced in 2009 and is the first PhD in FE in the United States. It was introduced to meet the emerging job market demand in both academia and industry in areas that did not fit under existing PhD programs. The PhD in FE is distinguished from a PhD in Mathematical Finance in its emphasis on financial technology, modeling and simulation of financial systems at large. The PhD in FE is also different than that in Finance or in Financial Mathematics. Those distinctions make the Stevens PhD program unique in its value proposition that it offers to students, the industry and to the system. Current PhD topics include algorithmic trading technology, systemic risk engineering, large scale networks of networks. The topics are naturally aligned with faculty research activities. The program is highly selective and currently has 8 students and it follows the general guidelines of the PhD program in SSE.

Admission to the doctoral program is made through the school's PhD Admissions Committee, as described in section 3.A above.

MBA with a Concentration in Financial Engineering

The Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management (WJHSTM) in conjunction with the School of Systems and Enterprises offer a unique program which combines the quantitative elements of an engineering degree with the business topics typically taught in a MBA program. The program is designed so that students from various backgrounds can tailor their educational experience to meet their career objectives.

Systems Security Engineering Graduate Program

With the increasing reliance on networked computers in the military and in contemporary society, end-to-end security of information is now of paramount importance. Indeed, as noted by John Brennan, Special Assistant to the President for Counterterrorism and Homeland Security, "The national security and economic health of the United States depend on the security, stability, and integrity of our Nation's cyberspace, both in the public and private sectors." Unfortunately, neither the public nor private sector is prepared for the task. Reports of breaches to our nation's information infrastructure are becoming increasingly common, affecting everything from our nation's energy grid to networked weapons platforms. Systems security has evolved from being simply an IT issue to one that directly impacts the nation's stature and well-being. Current and emerging opportunities in security require a systems approach, which integrates the traditional disciplines of computer science, electrical engineering and mathematics, with economics and policy within a systems framework.

The Systems Security Engineering Program integrates topics in security requirements, secure system architecture, security system engineering, technology governance, and information assurance in order to provide a systems perspective on security issues. These issues span the lifecycle of secure systems, and are encountered via both classroom instruction and hands-on assignments intended to accelerate the student experience in the field of systems security. The four certificate courses provide the solid body of knowledge required to develop sound designs for secure systems, as well as to assess system security architecture.

Master of Science in Systems Security Engineering

The School of Systems and Enterprises has created an exceptional Master's Degree program in Systems Engineering Security. The curriculum leverages the capabilities of the Institute to offer a unique, leading-edge program that combines education in Systems Engineering Security with courses in other security-related fields to create a holistic experience that is consistent with experience in real-world security issues. The program provides a core body of knowledge required to practice Systems Engineering Security and architecture. It also includes hands-on experience in a laboratory environment, making it particularly well suited for professionals currently working or aspiring to work in cybersecurity and its related fields. This is a unique program that establishes Stevens leadership in the emerging field of Systems Engineering Security education. It provides both experienced professionals and academics with the cutting-edge skills needed to excel in the increasingly complex world of systems security.

The Master of Science degree in Systems Security Engineering consists of 10 courses for a total of 30 credits. Students wishing to enroll in any of the SES programs must have an undergraduate degree in a technical discipline.

The program consists of ten courses and includes the following required courses:

  • SES 602: Secure Systems Foundations
  • SES 622: Fundamentals of Systems Engineering Security
  • SES 623: Systems Security Architecture and Design
  • SYS 605: Systems Integration
  • SYS 625: Systems Engineering Fundamentals
  • SYS 660: Decision and Risk Analysis

Four (4) additional courses are required to complete the Masters Degree. Required courses must be supplemented with the following courses or, with approval, security-related course offerings from various disciplines offered at Stevens. Note that some courses may have necessary prerequisites:

Development of Secure Systems:

  • SSW 556: Software Development for Trusted Systems
  • SSW 567: Software Testing, Quality Assurance, and Maintenance
  • SSW 689: Engineering of Trusted Systems

Systems Security and Information Assurance:

  • SES 543: Fundamentals of Information Systems Audit and Control
  • SES 546: Information Security Management
  • SES 543: Risk Analysis and Economics of Security

The final course may be an elective listed above, or may be a faculty-assisted research project in systems security engineering.

Graduate Certificates

The Graduate Certificate in Systems Engineering Security integrates crucial topics spanning the lifecycle of secure systems. Participants are provided hands-on assignments focusing on: technology governance, security requirements, secure system architecture, security system engineering, and information assurance. The four certificate courses provide the solid core required to develop sound designs for secure systems. The Graduate Certificate program requires 4 courses for a total of 12 credits. The courses are:

  • SES 602: Secure Systems Foundations
  • SES 603: Secure Systems Laboratory
  • SES 622: Fundamentals of Systems Engineering Security
  • SES 623: Systems Security Architecture and Design

Sociotechnical Systems Graduate Program

Director -- Dr. Ali Mostashari

Sociotechnical Systems are complex large-scale technology-intensive systems with a large number of stakeholders, where technological complexity and social complexity need to be tackled in an integrated fashion. Examples include the internet (and its problems of security, privacy, and design), urban, regional and global transportation systems, regional and national power grids, telecommunication networks, the global financial system, environmental systems, national healthcare systems, cities and other large-scale projects with significant societal impact.

The Sociotechnical Systems Master's Program provides students with the ability to analyze and model such systems, design policies and strategies for their sustainable management and propose ways for their continuous improvement. This highly interdisciplinary program is primarily a research degree preparing students for Ph.D. programs in Sociotechnical Systems, Public Policy, Strategic Management, Engineering Management, Financial Engineering, and other related disciplines. The program is also suitable for decision-makers, managers and planners of complex large-scale systems such as infrastructure systems (transportation, energy, water, telecommunications, emergency services etc.), the global financial system, national healthcare systems, emerging cities and other large-scale projects with significant societal impact. Leveraging insights from systems thinking, complexity science, management, public policy, economics and modeling and simulation, the program allows students to acquire the knowledge, skills and tools necessary to engage some of the most complex issues facing humanity today.

The Master's Program in Infrastructure Systems is a professional program intended for those students with the desire to pursue careers in management, planning and decision-making for transportation, energy, telecommunications infrastructure at the urban, regional, national and global scale.

All students applying to the Master's Programs in Sociotechnical Systems are required to submit wither GRE or GMAT scores and meet the schools TOEFL requirements. Students who wish to pursue a career in academics can pursue a six credit hour thesis option. Students wishing to enroll in this program must have an undergraduate degree in engineering, management or a related discipline with some quantitative background.

Graduate Certificate

The Graduate Certificate in Enterprise Architecture and Governance adapts and applies traditional systems engineering approaches and systems thinking techniques to a broader class of human-centric systems that we refer to as a enterprises, of which a technical system is only one part. The Graduate Certificate program requires 4 courses for a total of 12 credits. The courses are:

  • ES 621 Introduction to Enterprise Systems
  • ES 677 Enterprise Governance
  • MIS 712 Enterprise Architecture
  • SYS 684 Systems Thinking and Enterprise Systems

Master of Science in Infrastructure Systems

The MS in Enterprise Systems consists of ten courses (six core and four advisor directed electives) and includes:

  • ES 621 Fundamentals of Enterprise Systems
  • EM 600 Engineering Economics and Cost Analysis
  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  • SYS 681 Dynamic Modeling of Systems and Enterprises
  • ES 684 Systems Thinking
  • ES 810 Special Problems in Enterprises Systems

Note students wishing to pursue the thesis option will take 6 credit hours of ES 900 and not take ES 800.

The Master of Science Program in Infrastructure Systems is designed to provide professionals with an interest in the design, management and decision-making for Infrastructure Systems with the ability to tackle complex issues facing infrastructure systems in the 21st century. Designed as a global program, this program will draws on students from diverse countries and backgrounds to provide a truly global educational experience. In addition to taking courses on infrastructure systems design and management, graduate students will be exposed to courses on systems thinking, leadership, complex project management and engineering economics. Additionally, students who do not wish to finish in 1 year will have the option of doing an internship with a New York/New Jersey Metropolitan Area organization during the summer semester.

The program consists of 9 courses and a three-hour special projects class or 8 courses and a 6 credit hour thesis for a total of 30 credits.

Core Courses

  • ES 621 Fundamentals of Enterprise Systems
  • ES 690 Introduction to Infrastructure Systems
  • ES 684A Systems Thinking
  • SYS 681 Dynamic Modeling of Systems and Enterprises
  • EM 612 Project Management of Complex Systems
  • EM 600 Engineering Economics and Cost Analysis

Students will also take two elective courses (with 6 credit ES 900 thesis option) or three elective courses (with 3 credit ES 800 Master's Project option) from one of the following concentration areas, based on their interest and with approval of their advisor. Courses beyond the current list can be substituted with the approval of the advisor.

Concentration: Maritime Systems

  • OE 505 Introduction to Maritime Systems
  • OE 614 Economic Issues in Maritime Systems
  • SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation

Concentration: Transportation Systems

  • CM 508 Transportation Engineering
  • OE 505 Introduction to Maritime Systems
  • SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation

Concentration: Energy Systems

  • ME 510 Power Plant Engineering
  • EM 605 Elements of Operations Research
  • EN 587 Environmental Law and Management

Concentration: Networked Information Systems

  • NIS 560 Intro Networked Info Systems
  • NIS 654 Design and Analysis of Network Systems
  • NIS 678 Information Networks I

Concentration: Telecommunication Systems

  • TM 601 Principles of Applied Telecommunication Technologies
  • TM 612 Regulation and Policy in the Telecomm Industry
  • TM 624 Network Management

Concentration: Governance and Management

  • MGT 690 Organizational Theory and Design
  • MGT 690 Designing Complex Organizations
  • EN 587 Environmental Law and Management

Concentration: Systems Analysis and Modeling

  • EM 605 Elements of Operations Research
  • SYS 611 Modeling and Simulation
  • SYS 625 Fundamentals of Systems Eng

International Program with National University of Malaysia (UKM)

SSE, in partnership with the National University of Malaysia (UKM), offers a dual degree program leading to Master of Engineering (ME) in Systems Engineering or Engineering Management from Stevens and a Master of Science (MSc) in Industrial and Technology Management from UKM. For candidates to gain this dual Masters degree they must fulfill a minimum of 33 credits by:
  1. Completing 3 core courses at UKM and 2 technical elective, and
  2. Completing 4 core courses in Systems Engineering at SIT and 1 technical elective, and
  3. Completing 1 project-based UKM independent study. 
Applicants should apply to their perspective host university.

Doctoral Programs

The programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree are designed to develop the student's ability to perform research or high-level design in Systems Engineering, Financial Engineering, Engineering Management and/or Enterprise Systems. Admission to the Doctoral program is made through the school's Committee on Doctoral Admissions (CDA) and is based on a review of the candidate's scholastic record, professional accomplishments and the fit between his/her research objectives and those of the available SSE faculty. All admitted students must have the potential to advance the state of the art in their field of research. The CDA is chaired by the SSE Associate Dean for Research with representation from each of the major Doctoral programs.

For domestic students, admission to the Doctoral programs in SSE requires that the candidate has graduated from an ABET accredited undergraduate program, preferably in engineering or science. A Master's degree is usually required before a student is admitted to the Doctoral program. A student's Master's level academic performance and/or career must reflect his/her ability to pursue advanced studies and perform independent research. Typically a GPA of 3.5 or better at Master's level and 3.0 or better at the undergraduate level is required for admission to the Doctoral program. International students must also demonstrate proficiency in the English language prior to admission by scoring at least 550 (210 for computer-based) on the TOEFL examination.

All Doctoral applicants are required to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) results. However, applicants who are completing an SSE Master's degree, have an exceptionally strong record and have a strong reference from an SSE faculty member who is familiar with their work may appeal for a waiver of the GRE requirement. In addition, applicants who believe that they have shown exceptionally strong evidence of their research capabilities in their selected Doctoral field may also appeal for a GRE waiver along with submission of their completed application. All appeals to waive the GRE requirement must be made in writing to the SSE Associate Dean of Research describing the reasons for the request. Applicants may submit GMAT scores in lieu of GREs for the Doctorate in Engineering Management and Enterprise Systems.

In addition, each applicant must submit a current resume or curriculum vitae, three recommendations and a Statement of Purpose. The Statement of Purpose should be limited to three pages and describe the applicant's academic interests, proposed course work, research interests and rationale, general career objectives and desired full/part-time student status. Applicants are strongly encouraged to review the available Doctoral advisors on the SSE website sse.stevens.edu/nc/people/faculty/ and identify those who they believe are most closely aligned with their desired areas of research in their Statement of Purpose. The Statement of Purpose not only represents the student's interests, motivations and goals, but also is a reflection of his/her ability to communicate effectively and reflects the maturity of his/her research aspirations. Each applicant must also submit an example of his/her written technical work. This work should be written solely by the applicant; published work, if available, is most desirable. All applications for part-time studies must include a letter of commitment from the applicant's employer.

The following is a summary of the application submission contents:

  • Statement of Purpose: which includes academic interests, proposed course work, research interests and rationale, general career objectives and desired full/part-time status
  • Current resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Official transcripts for all schools of higher learning (university, colleges, etc.) attended; >3.0 undergrad, >3.5 graduate
  • A Master's degree in a related area is strongly recommended
  • GRE test scores
  • TOEFL > 550 (scores for non-native speakers of English)
  • Three recommendations
  • Evidence of written work: such as a technical document written solely by the applicant; published work is most desirable
  • Letter of endorsement from employer for part-time studies

While applications are accepted in a rolling admissions process throughout the school year, due to limitations in available faculty advisors it is strongly encouraged that students complete their application submissions by March 15th for entry in the fall semester and by August 15th for entry in the spring semester. Applicants who have submitted complete applications by these dates will be notified of their admission decision by April 30th and September 30th, respectively. Applications received after these dates will be considered for any remaining open positions and notified within four to six weeks after the complete application has been received.

Admission is based not only upon the applicant's qualifications, but also on the match in research and education objectives, available research funding, and the availability of faculty for supervision. Note that all accepted students must meet a minimal set of standards, but due to limitations on available staff and positions, all who have met these standards may not be accepted.

Effective Fall 2012, the minimum requirements for the Ph.D. degree are 84 graduate credits beyond the Bachelor's degree including Institute requirements. To be eligible for this credit reduction, all doctoral students must successfully complete a Stevens Institute three credit signature course which will be available starting Fall 2012. This signature course will be an Institute requirement for all doctoral students entering the program beginning in the Fall of 2012 and is to be taken during the semester in which the student is expecting to undergo his/her Proposal Defense. This signature course will be offered at no expense to the student. Students enrolled in the SSE Doctoral program prior to Fall 2012 who elect not to take the signature course will be required to have a minimum of 90 graduate credits. A prior Master's degree earned at another institution may be transferred for up to 30 credits without specific course descriptions with approval of the department and the Dean of Graduate Academics. Up to one-third of additional course credits may be transferred with the approval of the advisory committee and the Dean of Graduate Academics. The additional credits required for the Ph.D. beyond the Master's degree may not have been already used towards any other degree. A grade of "B" or better (3.0) is required for such courses. (A grade of B- is not acceptable.) No credits may be transferred towards dissertation research.

It is an Institute policy that a student who has earned a Master's degree or its equivalent is allowed a maximum of six years to complete the requirements for the Doctoral degree. Requests for an extension of this limit must be made in writing to the student's Doctoral Advisor who will then make his/her recommendation to the Dean of Gradate Academics.

It is also an Institute policy that all regular students are expected to maintain continuity of enrollment, except for summer sessions. If this cannot be done, the student must apply in writing for a leave of absence, from his/her Doctoral Advisor, which is subject to the approval of the Dean of Graduate Academics. A leave of absence is granted for a limited period only. The period may be extended at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Academics. Time spent in the Armed Forces of the United States while on leave of absence is not included in the six-year limitation noted above. Time spent on leave of absence for other reasons may or may not be included in the six-year limitation. Each case is decided on the basis of individual circumstances by the Dean of Graduate Academics.

A Leave of Absence does not waive a review of an action on a student's academic performance. Students who do not maintain continuity of enrollment and who do not obtain a leave of absence may be dropped from the program. Re-enrollment requires permission of the Dean of the Graduate Academics and the SSE Associate Dean of Research.

The Committee on Doctoral Admissions (CDA) will meet annually at the end of the academic year to review the progress of all Doctoral students. In the event that a student does not make any significant progress during an academic year, the CDA in concert with the Doctoral Advisor reserves the option to 1) place the student on probation such that he/she will have to develop a remediation plan to accelerate progress, 2) change that program of study from Ph.D. to a Master's degree or 3) disenroll him/her from the program.

Upon acceptance into the Doctoral program, each student will be assigned a Doctoral Advisor based on their stated research interest noted in their Statement of Purpose. The Doctoral Advisor serves the dual role of academic and research advisor with the purpose of getting the student started with his/her program of study and Doctoral research. The Doctoral Advisor also serves as the Chair or co-Chair of the Doctoral Advisory Committee (DAC) and must be a tenured/tenure-track faculty member, professor emeritus or an approved faculty member within SSE. A change can be made of the Doctoral Advisor through the mutual consent of the current and proposed advisor with approval by the SSE Associate Dean of Research.

A Doctoral Advisory Committee (DAC) is composed of at least four members; one of whom is the Doctoral Advisor serving as Chair, and the other must be a Stevens professor from another department or program outside of SSE. It is permissible and desirable to have as a committee member a highly qualified person from outside Stevens. It is strongly recommended that at least three of the DAC members are from Stevens faculty. A minimum of three DAC members must have Ph.D. degrees. All members of the DAC who do not have a Ph.D. degree must be approved by the SSE Associate Dean of Research.

Prior to the Qualifying Exam, the Doctoral Advisor and the Doctoral student nominate the members of the DAC. (It should be noted that the Stevens professor from another department or program outside of SSE is not required for the Qualifying Exam.) A DAC appointment form is completed and submitted to the SSE Associate Dean of Research (who fills the role of Department Director) and the Dean of Graduate Academics for approval. Once a DAC is formed, it cannot be changed without the approval of the current and new committee members; appeals may be made to the SSE Associate Dean of Research. Students are encouraged to meet individually with the members of their DAC prior to their proposal and thesis defenses or at the recommendation of their Doctoral Advisor.

The purpose of the Qualifying Examination is to assess the candidate's ability to conduct independent, Doctoral-quality research, communicate effectively and develop original ideas in his/her chosen area of research interest. The candidate should develop a "Research Interest Statement" (see appendix A for guidance) that articulates his/her research interests. Students are encouraged to take one or two SYS/EM/ES 800 courses, to collaborate with their Doctoral Advisor and to develop the details of their research statement that will provide a context for their dissertation research. It is suggested that the students should typically take this course as their 5 or 6th course. Students may not schedule the Qualifying Examination until they have completed their core courses. Students are permitted to enroll in a maximum of 10 dissertation credits (SYS960) prior to taking the Qualifying Examination. However, there is an associated risk in taking the maximum allowed dissertation credits prior to passing the qualification exam. SYS960 credits are pass/fail credits. If the student does not pass the qualification exam, the credits cannot be counted toward another degree. Careful consideration and discussion with the Doctoral Advisor must be undertaken before taking the allowed number of dissertation credits and before taking the Qualifying Examination. Students must be registered during the semester that the Qualifying Examination is taken. The Qualifying Exam should take place at the end of the first year for full-time students and at the end of the second year for part time students.

The Qualifying Examination has two components - written and oral. For the written component, the candidate sends to his/her Doctoral Advisor an electronic copy of his/her Research Interest Statement, which the Doctoral Advisor distributes to the rest of the DAC. Upon receiving the Research Statement, each member of the DAC will develop two or three questions intended to examine the candidate's ability to conduct research and synthesize objective and cogent responses to these questions. These questions may or may not be based on the student's research statement. However, they will require critical review of relevant papers and comprehensive assessment of the significance of anticipated research within the related literature, both academic and practitioner. The Doctoral Advisor will collect these questions from the DAC, synthesize them into a single exam and transmit them to the student. The student is expected to respond to all questions within two weeks, responding with an electronic copy of responses to all questions the day the exam is due (it is highly recommended that part-time Doctoral students take time off from work as this exam is extremely taxing, and it is extremely difficult to pass while also working full-time).

While the structure and duration of the Oral Examination is determined by the DAC, the following is a brief description of a typical process. The student presents the answers that he/she has proposed to each of the questions in the written exam. This presentation may take approximately 1-2 hours. The student generally has access to any materials needed to present the justification for his/her responses. The DAC may ask additional questions, which are likely to be based on the student's responses and may extend into areas beyond the Research Interest Statement. These questions may be asked during or after the presentation, depending on the DAC's preference. The duration of the question and answer period will be determined by the DAC and should be sufficient to allow a majority determination of pass or fail.

The student's DAC administers the Qualifying Examination. To pass the Qualifying Exams, a Doctoral candidate must have a favorable vote from a majority of the examining/advisory committee, with at most a single negative vote. If performance on the examination is unsatisfactory, the student has the following two choices: 1) complete the requirements for a Master's degree and exit the Doctoral program or 2) wait one full semester (15 weeks) before the examination is administered a second time. Students failing the examination twice will be dismissed from the Doctoral program. Students who pass the Qualifying Examination are then considered to be Doctoral Candidates.

A student pursuing a Doctoral degree should demonstrate, through the Qualifying Exam, this proposal and ultimately the dissertation, the ability to conduct high-quality, original and creative research. The writing style, grammar and spelling of the proposal and the dissertation should reflect a high level of written communication skills. The purpose of the Proposal Defense is to ensure that the dissertation is appropriately scoped and all members of the DAC are in agreement with the methodology, products, validation approach, results, etc., for the dissertation. This proposal should show that the research results could be publishable in a refereed journal.

Every Doctoral candidate is required to prepare a Research Proposal that addresses the following seven areas:

  1. describes the research content and why it is important
  2. presents a literature review to demonstrate what others have done in the area
  3. discusses the research outcome(s) anticipated including its relationship to related published research
  4. proposes a research validation approach
  5. articulates the specific contributions to the field of endeavor
  6. articulates the creative content and uniqueness of the research effort
  7. describes anticipated obstacles

The candidate must clearly articulate to his/her DAC why and how he/she proposes to accomplish this research. This proposal must be in a written form and formally presented to the candidate's DAC. As a minimum, the candidate should have Chapter 1 (Problem Statement) or equivalent, Chapter 2 (Literature Review) or equivalent, Chapter 3 (Approach), emerging results, validation and verification plan, schedule for completing the dissertation, content and target journals to publish the results of the research along with a schedule for their publication. In addition, the candidate should have one paper accepted for publication in a peer reviewed journal that is derived from the research related to the proposal. The Proposal Defense should take place after the student has completed 15-18 research credits (See Figure 1). Typically, for a full-time student the Proposal Defense should take place 6-9 months after initiation of research on his/her chosen a thesis topic; for a part-time student this should take place approximately one year after the initiation of this research (See Figure 2).

The Proposal Defense document must be made available to the Doctoral Advisory Committee at least two weeks before the scheduled event. Feedback on the Proposal Defense will be given to the student by his/her Doctoral Advisor within seven days of its completion. To pass the Proposal Defense, a degree candidate must have a favorable vote from a majority of the DAC, with at most a single negative vote. If the student does not pass the Proposal Defense, he/she has the option to complete the requirements for a Master's degree and exit the Doctoral program or schedule a second defense within one semester while remedying deficiencies noted in the defense. Students failing the defense twice will be dismissed from the Doctoral program.

The dissertation is the capstone of the Doctoral program and should result in research that advances the state of the art in the chosen field. Dissertations may be written in a traditional format or composed of a portfolio where the main body of the dissertation integrates a set of refereed journals and peer reviewed conference papers which are included as appendices for the details. Regardless of the format, the results of the research must be deemed publishable in major scholarly journals.

The following are the guidelines for publication prior to dissertation defense, but should be considered the norm:

  • one (1) accepted peer reviewed journal article
  • one (1) submitted peer reviewed journal article
  • two (2) presented refereed conference papers

The intent of this requirement is the belief that peer reviewed research produces a superior dissertation, providing a broad review of quality and dissemination of the results to a wider community.

At the completion of the research, the candidate must defend his/her dissertation in a public presentation. A private defense, which is limited to the DAC, is required prior to scheduling the Public Defense. The scheduling of the Public Defense requires passing the private defense by the majority of the DAC, with at most a single negative vote. The private defense can be waived with approval by the majority of the DAC, with at most a single negative vote. All students are strongly encouraged to meet individually with the DAC before the Public Defense to ensure that the dissertation has met their expectations.

After the dissertation has been accepted and approved by the DAC, the student, in conjunction with the School of Systems and Enterprises, shall schedule the final public oral examination. The dissertation abstract shall be submitted to the Office of the Registrar to publicize the Public Defense of Doctoral Dissertation at least ten working days before the examination. The Defense must take place at least three weeks before Commencement. The final dissertation document must be made available to the DAC for distribution to the public at the time of scheduling. It is strongly encouraged that all SSE research faculty members attend the public defense. To pass the final examination, a degree candidate must have a favorable vote from a majority of the DAC, with at most a single negative vote.

If a student fails the Public Defense, there must be a lapse of one full semester (15 weeks) before rescheduling the defense. A student is allowed no more than two opportunities to successfully defend the dissertation. If a student fails, he/she must either dis-enroll from the program or exit the program with a Master's degree.

Students interested in the Doctoral Program should consult the SSE website for updates and additional information.

School of Systems & Enterprises

Dinesh Verma, Dean

Anthony Barrese, Associate Dean

Ralph Giffin, Acting Director, Systems Division

Jose Ramirez-Marquez, Director, Enterprise and Science Division

Khaldoun Khashanah, Director, Financial Engineering Division

Sally Muscarella, Director, Outreach and Alliances

Sharon Crowley, Operations Coordinator